Loading…
This event has ended. View the official site or create your own event → Check it out
This event has ended. Create your own
View analytic

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Wednesday, June 26
 

9:00am

A Serious Game for Learning Medical Team Communication Skills

Teamwork training in healthcare ideally requires collaborative practice in a risk free environment but is difficult to schedule and coordinate effectively for the multitude of disciplines involved. To train and assess future doctors and nurses, we developed a serious game; On Call. On Call is designed to teach communication skills on a social platform where cooperation is rewarded.

This presentation provides an overview of the project, and the game, and discusses how it evaluates player behavior.


Speakers

Wednesday June 26, 2013 9:00am - 9:25am
Room C: Patriot Room

9:00am

The Year in Mobile Games for Health
This project focuses on the last year in mobile games for health with a focus on interesting observations about recently released projects and market dynamics.  Attendees to this session will get a level set both on what the possibility space of mobile games for health is producing so far, and where the market and field generally sit.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Sawyer

Ben Sawyer

Co-Founder, Digitalmill
Games for Health


Wednesday June 26, 2013 9:00am - 9:30am
Room B: Back Bay Grand

9:35am

Avatar-Based Role-Play Conversations to Increase Patient Engagement: A Case Study

In this case study we will discuss how Kognito collaborated with the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene to build a simulation to train the City’s 7,000 primary care providers (PCP) to (1) identify patients who are manifesting signs of PTSD, depression, substance/alcohol abuse, and suicidal ideation and (2) build intrinsic motivation within these patients to increase adherence to treatment plans that integrate behavioral health components. This CME approved simulation was developed to enhance the City’s preparedness to deal with possible surges of patients presenting with mental health symptoms following traumatic events such as terrorist attacks and hurricanes.

The presentation will include a demo of the simulation, discussion on the collaboration and development process, and initial results from a study that examined efficacy.


Speakers
avatar for Ron Goldman

Ron Goldman

Co-Founder & CEO, Kognito Interactive
Ron Goldman is the co-founder & CEO of Kognito Interactive, an award-winning developer of avatar-based role-playing training games in the areas of health and behavioral health. Ron has extensive experience as an entrepreneur in the areas of new media, games, and entertainment. Ron is a frequent speaker at conferences about the future of gaming technology for learning and social change and about innovative business models. Ron also established... Read More →


Wednesday June 26, 2013 9:35am - 10:00am
Room C: Patriot Room

9:45am

Improving emotional well-being one scientifically proven app and game at a time.

ORCAS has 20 years of experience conducting extensive behavioral research that addresses modern health and wellness challenges. Michael Mulvihill will discuss how ORCAS applies scientifically-proven research to the design and development of apps that help people manage their healthcare and change their behavior in healthy, meaningful, personally relevant ways. Michael will highlight several evidence-based apps developed and studied in randomized clinical trials by ORCAS, among them MoodHacker, a mobile app supporting depression self-management. 

Attendees of this lecture will have a better understanding of:

  • The challenges of self-management in today’s healthcare environment
  • How ORCAS is applying gamification, personal user recommendations, and persuasive design to address challenges of user experience and engagement
  • How to maintain scientific integrity and produce successful outcomes in product development

The goal of ORCAS is to demonstrate long-term behavior change through evidence based outcomes. The result is improved health for individuals, which can drive down individual costs and costs to organizations when adopted by health care systems.


Wednesday June 26, 2013 9:45am - 10:15am
Room B: Back Bay Grand

9:45am

Games for Global Health: What Exists So Far?
This talk will provide an overview of work done to date relevant to games in global health and serve as a lead-in to a discussion of the games for global health possibility space.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Sawyer

Ben Sawyer

Co-Founder, Digitalmill
Games for Health


Wednesday June 26, 2013 9:45am - 10:30am
Room D: Freedom Room

10:10am

Games to Improve Hospital Responses to Mass Casualty Incidents

During this session attendees will see insights into two different Breakaway Games projects aimed at improving mass casualty response by hospital systems. See how two different games, developed by the same company, on the same topic were approached to make unique use of their core-game genres and the needs of their users.

Hospital Incident Command, is a web delivered multi-player game-based training solution that provides civilian hospitals /healthcare systems with a virtual capability to train personnel in the HICS processes/protocols for operational and mass casualty incidents. Target users include civilian hospital managers, emergency planners, emergency responders, public health officials, physicians, nurses, or everyone who may be involved in the planning & management of a hospital’s response to a Mass Casualty Incident (MCI).

While Hospital Incident Command focuses on a strategy-game like sim-hospital approach, Rampart, another Breakaway project is more individual player focused. Rampart, recreates the high stress, high stakes environment of a trauma center. The player completes a shift as an Emergency Room physician. They must make important diagnosis and treatment calls for multiple virtual patients in a tight time frame. This task is complicated by the range of realistic distractions that make a trauma center a nightmare of multi-tasking.



Wednesday June 26, 2013 10:10am - 10:35am
Room C: Patriot Room

10:30am

Pocket Ritual: Developing A Phone App For Self-Exploration Based On The Hero's Journey
Self-directed play can get us in touch with our inner truth. If we follow our internal play-compass, it points the way to an authentic life, or what Joseph Campbell calls “bliss”. Free play, however, does not come easily to adults. If one is out-of-touch with oneself, one does not know where to start. In games, play is guided by rules. But usually games are about a specific, pre-defined idea.

This presentation focuses on the design of “Pocket Ritual”, a windows phone app for self-exploration, which addresses this issue. “Pocket Ritual” is a ludic framework that leverages the potential of free play for self-discovery, while providing a structure to guide it. At its center are 12 card categories, corresponding to the 12 steps of the hero’s journey. Each morning, the app randomly suggests cards within these 12 categories for players to build a hand and play throughout the day. Cards contain evocative questions for contemplation that refer to a stage on the journey. E.g. a card that belongs to the “mentor” stage might ask about supportive / admirable qualities in people (dead or alive) that you would like to be your mentors. Players can decide to accept or skip cards. Playing a card is accompanied by uploading a picture and adjective that represent the player’s emotional associations with the card. This process constructs the “Journey Landscape”. Each card category has a corresponding landscape tile (e.g. “ordinary world”; “threshold”; “inmost cave”). Playing cards transforms their associated landscape tiles, creating unique journeys that further invite reflection: if the pictures and adjectives associated with the “Threshold” are fearful or hesitant, this will be reflected in the audio-visual representation of the “Threshold” part of the journey.

The goal of this presentation on “Pocket Ritual” is to provide a further example of, and invite a dialogue about how games and ludic applications can promote emotional health and personal development, as well as to inspire more design work in that direction. The talk will give concrete examples of how research on play, creative recovery, authentic living and positive psychology informed the design, and reflect on the issues revolving around structured vs. free play to leverage play’s potential for personal growth.

Speakers
avatar for Doris Rusch

Doris Rusch

Chicago, IL, USA, DePaul University
The human condition is extremely fascinating to me: what makes us tick? What's the spectrum of our emotions? How do we make sense of our experiences and share them with others? Games are a great medium to create shared experiences related to the human condition. One of my main areas of exploration related to that are mental health issues and the use of metaphors to make abstract ideas tangible. I made a few metaphorical games about addiction... Read More →


Wednesday June 26, 2013 10:30am - 11:00am
Room B: Back Bay Grand

10:45am

Discussion: What are the top 10 issues in global health games could best address?
The goal of this discussion is to use the process of ranking the top 10 needs in global health that games can best address to explore where games overall can make a difference and where they may have less of an impact. The results of this discussion will be a few pages of communal output offering specific insight and direction as to where investments in games for global health should be focused and a taxonomy of action that is rated from most important and possible, to least important and possible.

Moderators
Wednesday June 26, 2013 10:45am - 11:30am
Room D: Freedom Room

10:50am

Technology Innovation Centers vs. Technology Service Centers

Lessons from how universities might focus and structure their interdisciplinary work in games and simulations.



Speakers
avatar for Brock Dubbels PhD

Brock Dubbels PhD

Experimental Psychologist, G-Scale Game Development and Testing Laboratory, McMaster University Dept Computer Software Engineering
I like spending time with friends, the sound of children playing, and bare-knuckle fighting | | Educational research in cognitive psychology, curriculum and instruction, game design, theories of play and learning, assessment, instructional design, and technology innovation.


Wednesday June 26, 2013 10:50am - 11:30am
Room C: Patriot Room

11:10am

RESERVED FOR PANEL
Wednesday June 26, 2013 11:10am - 12:00pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

11:40am

Serious Gaming for Central Line Placement

Approximately 5 million central venous catheters (CVCs) are placed by physicians annually in the United States, with a complication rate of 15%. Guidelines and recommendations are continually being established and updated regarding CVC placement. While much has been done regarding training the technical skills of CVC placement using part-task trainers, successfully finding and cannulating a central vein is but one part of the process. In fact, many steps designed to prevent untoward involve non-technical skills which are perhaps more important in training practitioners to safely place CVCs.

This session details a game based around the placement of CVCs that will be used as a new teaching modality in a pilot program for instructing residents in safe CVC placement. Built using the Unreal platform with support from Arizona State University the games design incorporates current best-practices for CVC, and protocols used at The Mount Sinai Medical Center (MSMC) Department of Anesthesiology.

Users are able to play the game which begins before materials for line placement have been gathered and ends after line placement. Users receive feedback as to steps missed and areas for improvement as the stages of the game progress, followed by a report card after completion. Points are awarded for adhering to standard practices, while points are deducted for skipping steps or not adhering guidelines.

After a lengthy game development phase including several iterations; our CVC game was completed. The game was introduced at the Mt. Sinai Hospital within the department of anesthesiology. The game was rolled out as part of a pilot program where residents in the department of anesthesiology were randomized to have access to the game or to maintain standard practices. We then graded them on a standardized line placement to determine the effectiveness of our game. We found that those who had access to the game were able to place a CVC in safer manner than those who did not. They were also more comfortable with the process, and felt as though they were better equipped to teach others this skill


Speakers

Wednesday June 26, 2013 11:40am - 12:05pm
Room C: Patriot Room

11:45am

The Global Health Response Engine Project

The University of Southern California Institute for Global Health and Games Institute have collaborated on the development of a game-based global health curriculum. The project has three core instructional goals. First, to develop an interactive tool that teaches core competencies required of global health students, as identified by the American Schools of Public Health. Second, to illustrate the systems nature of global health and not shy away from the multi-leveled complexity that often defines global health challenges. In fulfilling this commitment, the project team built and attempted to integrate a scientific agent-based model to developing a credible, data-driven experience reflective, to the extent possible and appropriate, of real world cause and effect relationships. Third, to increase awareness of specific intervention approaches currently being used and tested to address health concerns.

An initial scenario has been completed focused on maternal health, while the game environment and mechanisms provide the platform to quickly develop more scenarios representing different global health challenges. The audience for the Global Health Response Engine (GHRE) include college- and graduate-level students, instructors, and public health practitioners.


Speakers

Wednesday June 26, 2013 11:45am - 12:15pm
Room D: Freedom Room

12:00pm

Lunch
Wednesday June 26, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

12:05pm

Lunch & Joint Sessions with Mobile Track
Wednesday June 26, 2013 12:05pm - 2:00pm
Room C: Patriot Room

12:15pm

Lunch
Wednesday June 26, 2013 12:15pm - 1:15pm
Room D: Freedom Room

1:00pm

ViviTouch : Mobile Haptics
How do hardware manufacturers differentiate their consumer devices from competitors that have seemingly similar performance and features? It all comes down to the user experience and how the user feels while interacting with the device. Haptic feedback plays a major role in creating a user interface that is much better than today’s standard, especially for complex menu structures or games. ViviTouch High Definition (HD) Feel translates virtually unlimited sensations into a versatile language of feedback in the palm of the hand so you actually feel what you see and hear—explosions, crashes, aerial battles, the stretch of a slingshot or the smooth roll of a pinball. New generation ViviTouch technology will allow direct and localized haptic contact with the actuator. For the first time, we will be introducing a truly breakthrough way to engage with haptics, thereby allowing this technology to become a new tool for designers to create innovative mobile products.

Wednesday June 26, 2013 1:00pm - 1:25pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

1:00pm

1:15pm

GameOn: A Student-Developed Game Initiative to Fight Malaria

This is a review of a project titled GameOn that focused on student-created games for populations at risk for malaria in Kenya.

In September 2012, Hanze University of Applied Sciences in Groningen (the Netherlands) started a 20-week program titled GameOn. Nineteen students, from nine different countries, participated and three applied games were developed. The purpose of the program was to help Kenyan children (ages 10 – 15 years) learn about prevention and treatment of malaria. The client for the games is HelpHeal, a community-based organization from Kisumu (West Kenya). HelpHeal is working in this region that is severely hit by this disease.

Together with the client and universities in Auckland (New Zealand) and Woodbury (Los Angeles, USA), the students worked on the games. Specific knowledge about the region, malaria, medication, and the target group was brought in by specialists. In January 2013 the games were tested in Kenya by HelpHeal and team members from Hanze. At three different primary schools, 26 children played the games and gave feedback. With this feedback the games were finalized and then shipped to the client. The games will be played now at the schools; preliminary results are very promising.

During this talk we’ll review the program itself, and take a look at the three games developed and what we learned from this cross-cultural and cross-continent collaboration.


Speakers
avatar for Rob Willems

Rob Willems

Lecturer Game Design & User Experience, Hanze University of Applied Sciences
Create (serious) games that make a difference. I've worked on a Wii game for visually impaired children and now on an educational game about malaria in Kenya.


Wednesday June 26, 2013 1:15pm - 1:45pm
Room D: Freedom Room

1:35pm

Introducing SimCoach An iPad Game & Engine for Safety Training
This talk covers the development and market deployment of SimCoach, a tablet based infrastructure for workforce behavior change.

Etcetera's simcoach™ solutions extend Game-Based Learning out of the training room into the workplace to deliver the next generation of workforce behavior change. simcoach™ is a collection of simpleimpactful and mobile training and coaching apps designed to engage today's workforce and enable supervisors as coaches. 

Speakers
avatar for Eben Myers

Eben Myers

VP of Design, Etcetera Edutainment
As Vice President of Design at Etcetera Edutainment, Eben Myers serves as lead designer and creative director on Etcetera's behavior change solutions, creating game-based learning and coaching tools for a broad range of customers within retail, manufacturing, and healthcare. | | With over a decade of game development and learning design experience, Eben shapes the behavior change process using the tools of a game designer, engaging... Read More →


Wednesday June 26, 2013 1:35pm - 2:00pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

2:00pm

MalariaSpot: Building a Global Network of Virtual Malaria Hunters Through Gameplay

According to the World Health Organization, approximately 216 million cases of malaria occur in the world each year, and the disease kills about 655,000 people annually. Malaria is a treatable infectious disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium, which is transmitted via the bites of infected mosquitoes. In the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells.

Currently, the gold standard for malaria diagnosis worldwide consists of first detecting parasites, and then counting the number of parasites in blood smears by using a microscope. Usually, the more the parasites the more severe is the infection. An average of 100 images have to be visually checked by a specialist, a process that can take up to 30 minutes. Confirmation of a negative diagnosis is ultimately dependent on the technician’s expertise. In addition, over time, as malaria prevalence decreases, microscopy technician skills may be redeployed elsewhere.

Thus, we need scalable, fast, ubiquitous, and accurate screening systems (a priority in the agenda for malaria eradication). Mobile phone coverage is reaching every corner of the planet and we see the global connectivity as an opportunity to distribute the images all over the Internet.

We believe that there is so much online talent out there that can be used to analyze malaria images (while you play a game!). To start with, we have developed the MalariaSpot game. During the game, we will log all the player clicks (scores) – both parasites accurately hunted and mistakes – so the analysis of all the games played will allow us to learn (a) how fast and accurate the parasite counting of non-expert microscopy players is, and (b) how to combine the analyses of different players to obtain accurate results as good as the ones provided by expert microscopists.


Speakers
avatar for Miguel A. Luengo-Oroz

Miguel A. Luengo-Oroz

MalariaSpot.org - Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, CEI Moncloa
[Games + Crowdsourcing + Artificial Intelligence + Mobile Technologies + Image Analysis + Diagnostics + Global Health + Big Data + People] | | Antidisciplinary scientist working on crowdsourcing, gamification and data science for global challenges in international development and global health. Currently, research fellow in Innovative Health at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid –founder of malariaspot.org - and the chief of research... Read More →


Wednesday June 26, 2013 2:00pm - 2:30pm
Room D: Freedom Room

2:10pm

Physician Education: It’s not a game

While we know that educating physicians on patient care solutions is vitally important (even serious), we can still have fun with how we educate. The CATALYST(tm) Procedure Simulation Library, developed by Medtronic, is an example of education tools being developed to do just that.

An iPad based system it provides simulation applications that are simple, yet richly interactive. The goal is to allow a surgeon to get over that initial learning curve in preparation for a more hands-on, laboratory training environment.


Speakers
avatar for Leif Goranson

Leif Goranson

Training & Education Specialist: Strategic Projects, Medtronic
I am a self-described technophile with a day job as an Interactive Education & Marketing Strategist. | I have a born penchant toward pushing the technological envelope. By innovating the ways we apply technology, and incongruously matching solutions, we enhance each future iteration - we enhance the very fabric of tomorrow.


Wednesday June 26, 2013 2:10pm - 2:35pm
Room C: Patriot Room

2:10pm

PlayForward : An iPad Game for HIV Prevention
PlayForward: Elm City Stories completed production in early December 2012 and began a randomized clinical trial in February 2013. PlayForward is an interactive world in which the player, using an Avatar (virtual character) they have created, "travels" through life, facing challenges and making decisions that bring different risks and benefits. The player will have the ability to see how their choices affect their lives and subsequently will be able to move back in time to see how different actions might lead to different outcomes.  By negotiating challenges in a highly repetitive and meaningful way, the player learns skills that translate to real life, equipping the player to avoid situations that increase their risk for HIV. Through a series of game play sessions, there will be many points at which we can track to see if the player is making the right choices - through video game play we can evaluate in real-time how our players are acquiring skills to help them make better choices.

This talk will showcase the completed game and discuss its transition to a clinical trial currently in process.

Speakers
KH

Kimberly Hiefje

Deputy Director, play2PREVENT Lab, Yale University School of Medicine
Dr. Hieftje's research interests primarily focus on health promotion and behavior change through the use of videogames. Dr. Hieftje is an Associate Research Scientist at Yale University, School of Medicine, where she is currently involved in the development and testing of several health behavior change videogames. She is the Project Director for a five-year NIH grant that focuses on the development and evaluation an interactive videogame... Read More →


Wednesday June 26, 2013 2:10pm - 2:35pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

2:45pm

Using A Serious Gaming Context to Change Physician Behavior: Improving the Management of Depression in Primary Care

This session will talk about a project designed to help primary care physicians who often lack the time or have not been trained to address the range of psychosocial issues presented.

Biological, psychological, and social factors all play a significant role in human functioning in the context of disease. In fact, as many as 70% of primary care visits are linked to underlying mental health and psychosocial issues; yet as many as 80% of patients with clinical depression are undiagnosed and undertreated because symptoms go unrecognized in the context of physical problems.

Diagnosing depression is largely subjective, as no biological tests exist to confirm major depression. Although most patients with mental health issues access the health system through primary care, many primary care physicians lack the time or have not been trained to address the range of psychosocial issues presented. Increasing knowledge and changing the behavior of primary care physicians regarding major depression management required a different approach than traditional continuing medical education.

To close the gap in delivering quality depression care, we realized we needed a new way of teaching, presenting content, and allowing physicians to interact with content. A serious game platform brought an effective learning environment and a new approach for effective learner engagement. Our online game is case-based and branched to effectively influence the way learners represent and process information, creating an environment that changes according to player input.


Speakers

Wednesday June 26, 2013 2:45pm - 3:10pm
Room C: Patriot Room

2:45pm

Using Citizen Science & Mobile Games to Beat Cancer
Cancer Research UK is a leading charity dedicated to saving lives through research and is funded entirely by the public.  This talk covers the emerging strategies, and game-based approaches Cancer Research UK is putting to work to beat cancer through citizen science based systems that aid cancer research.


Wednesday June 26, 2013 2:45pm - 3:10pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

2:45pm

Discussion: How to Structure a Games for Global Health Community
Although the games for health community has remained a loose conferedation of interested stakeholders, different approaches may work better for a games for global health community. For this discussion, the topic will be how to build and structure a global community of global health interests, game developers, researchers, and multinational interests that can effectively improve the opportunities and outcomes related to the use of games for global health.

Wednesday June 26, 2013 2:45pm - 3:30pm
Room D: Freedom Room

3:20pm

Gamification Expanding the CE Universe

Games are increasingly integrated into modern education, leveraging three critical aspects of learning theory: curiosity, imagination, and sense of play.

This session will present an interactive exploration of gaming activities based on a pilot study to explore the impact of an online game developed for pediatricians and other child health care professionals on the subject of vaccine protocol. The findings and implications will also be shared and discussed.


Speakers

Wednesday June 26, 2013 3:20pm - 3:45pm
Room C: Patriot Room

3:20pm

Mobile Gaming for Speech Therapy : Case Study of InTense in-development

InTense is a fun new way for kids to practise their verb tenses!  Designed in collaboration with speech and language professionals, InTense combines a verb tense language tool with a carnival themed video game set in the past, present and future.  InTense motivates kids to master language skills, while automatically tracking their progress and offering customizable reports to parents and health professionals.


Speakers

Wednesday June 26, 2013 3:20pm - 3:45pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

3:45pm

Games for a New Climate: An International Collaboration in Research and Design
Is play an effective vehicle for preparing for climate change? Can games be part of long-term strategies for better organizing volunteer-driven organizations? Do academic-driven research methods lead to field-ready tools? Over the last four years, Parsons The New School for Design’s PETLab has collaborated with the American Red Cross and the Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre to explore these and other questions. Games for a New Climate has produced games with ambitious goals: prepare communities at risk due to changes in the local climate; assist the Red Cross staff in training its volunteers; and help individuals and communities better forecast and plan for potential problems, including the implications of climate change on public health. John Sharp, PETLab’s co-director, will discuss the games the project has produced, the methodologies used for developing the games, and the successes and shortcomings of the project thus far.

Speakers
avatar for John Sharp

John Sharp

Associate Professor of Games and Learning, Parsons The New School of Design


Wednesday June 26, 2013 3:45pm - 4:15pm
Room D: Freedom Room

3:55pm

Designing A Mobile Health Game for The Complexities of Real Life and Utility

During the ideation phase, everything and anything is possible. But what happens as you move from ideation to prototype to product? In this session we'll discuss how you stay true to your product's mission and focus while dealing with the hard realities (and boundaries) of time and money.


Speakers
avatar for Rebecca Gervais

Rebecca Gervais

Project Manager, The Atom Group
avatar for fran melmed

fran melmed

CEO/Founder, context communication consulting
Owner of context communication consulting, a communication and change management consulting firm that specializes in workplace wellness. Co-founder of #co_health workplace wellness community and CoHealth Checkup, a monthly radio program on workplace wellness (@co_health). Creator of Hotseat, a mobile- and web-based tool to get us up and moving (GetHotseatApp.com). | | Passionate about: Food, Film, Fino, Fitness.


Wednesday June 26, 2013 3:55pm - 4:20pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

3:55pm

Improving U.S. HIV Care with Gamified Learning for Care Providers

In the U.S., half of the 1.2 million people infected with HIV are not engaged in regular care. The National HIV/AIDS strategy prioritizes the critical goals of linking patients to care and retaining them as part of an overall effort to ensure that patients and their communities benefit from advanced HIV treatments. To support this goal, bridge2care offers a self-directed e-learning platform designed to improve public health by training health care professionals on proven linkage and retention techniques.

Utilizing a set of integrated e-learning tools, bridge2.care provides training on skills related to communication, patient engagement and quality care. Modules are presented in a gamified environment that follows the “bridge” theme and allows users to collect points and progress badges as the move through the curriculum. The learning experience combines highly realistic, video-based patient-provider simulations with knowledge games to create an immersive, engaging experience.

The development of bridge2care was funded by Merck & Co. Inc., and the project was launched at the XIX International Conference on AIDS in July 2012. Based on initial pilot data from 25 HIV service organizations (comprising 56 front-line providers) in New York City, 93% of users reported that they felt prepared to implement the skills learned in bridge2care


Speakers
AC

Annie Costello

Senior Associate, Rabin Martin
avatar for David Golub

David Golub

Executive Vice President, Rabin Martin
I am an award-winning innovator with a passion for solving problems. I bring deep experience across the public and private sectors and focus on improving the health of vulnerable populations. In my work, I provide trusted counsel to senior leaders in life sciences companies and NGOs on U.S. and global public health.
TJ

Terri Jackson

Vice President, Rabin Martin


Wednesday June 26, 2013 3:55pm - 4:20pm
Room C: Patriot Room

4:30pm

Building a Public Physiology Research Platform for Health Games and Medical Simulation

The Developer Tools for Medical Education initiative is primarily focused on the creation of publicly accessible, free, open-license, and/or open-source tools for creation of medical training and education content and technology. Principally, the DTME initiative seeks to support the strategic goals of the Joint Program Committee 1 – Medical Training and Health Information Sciences Research Program (JPC1) through the leveraging of technologies created by this effort, finding cost efficiencies through utilization of free tools and allowing more commonality for military medical training technology systems.

It is envisioned that expanding a research effort to create this capability to an open public trial and experimentation basis will allow for feedback from a larger part of the medical training community than would otherwise be possible from a single group. Feedback regarding novel uses of the evolving research platform and the data created by this research will lead to improvements in the science regarding simulated physiology for use in public and private sector medical education.

The primary, but not exclusive, purposes of this effort is: 

1) Create a public physiology research platform for use by the medical simulation development and education community

2) Enable accurate and consistent simulated physiology across multiple training applications and platforms

3) Allow for community contributions to this effort

4) Encourage greater use of scientifically-based physiological & pharmacological predictive technologies

5) Lower barriers to creating medical training content through availability of this resource

6) Serve the training needs of the military

7) Expand the corpus of knowledge regarding the use of simulated physiology for medical education.

This talk will discuss the project and its current status.


Speakers

Wednesday June 26, 2013 4:30pm - 4:55pm
Room C: Patriot Room

4:30pm

Mobile Gaming for Diabetes Management & More
Ayogo, is a leading mobile-social focused games for health developer based in Vancouver, BC, and Boston, MA.  This talk will focus on several projects Ayogo has designed for mobile gaming environments involving not only diabetes but also heart rate regulation.  This talk will showcase not only those products but key lessons learned in developing and deploying them to target patient populations.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Fergusson

Michael Fergusson

CEO, Ayogo Health Inc.
Michael is CEO and founder of Ayogo, and dedicated to the idea that playing is one of the most meaningful and productive things we can do. He’s been an entrepreneur and innovator on the Web for over 15 years, and his games have been played by millions, on computers and smartphones all over the world. Michael has spoken eloquently about how games can increase patient engagement and improve health outcomes the 3rd Patient Adherence &... Read More →


Wednesday June 26, 2013 4:30pm - 4:55pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

4:30pm

5:05pm

Crowdsourced Role-Playing Games for Healthcare Training

Improving the quality of communication between healthcare providers and patients has the potential to improve outcomes.  Simulated role-playing can be employed to teach and practice social communication skills, however existing simulation technologies fail to deliver the nuance, variety, and richness of actual human interaction.  This talk presents a novel approach to dialogue and social interaction, which simulates interaction from a large database of recorded human interactions.  Combining artificial intelligence, natural language processing, and crowdsourcing, can deliver an authentic experience, facilitating transfer of knowledge from the virtual world to the real world.  Unlike traditional approaches to serious games, which rely on scripts and multiple choice dialogue options, this talk will demonstrate how a data-driven approach supports open-ended dialogue, where the user learns by expressing him or herself in his/her own words.



Speakers
avatar for Jeff Orkin

Jeff Orkin

Co-Founder, Giant Otter Technologies


Wednesday June 26, 2013 5:05pm - 5:30pm
Room C: Patriot Room

5:05pm

Designing Games For The Real World
These end of day talks for Out & About offer a nice capstone for the day.  Designers working on games that involve sport and active play away from computers discuss their projects and the insights gained in developing them.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Heggen

Mark Heggen

VP of Game Design, Hide&Seek
Mark Heggen is an experimental game designer in New York City. As an early member of Area/Code Games, Mark was a central designer on games such as early Facebook hit Parking Wars and cult classic Drop7, as well as education and social intervention projects such as Macon Money and Budgetball. After the studio’s acquisition by Zynga, he went on to work on games with millions of daily players. Mark has designed dozens of card games, new sports... Read More →
MS

Max Seidman

Game Designer, Tiltfactor
Max is a game designer at Tiltfactor, the game design and research lab for social change located at Dartmouth College. Tiltfactor is dedicated to using games for purposes beyond just fun, and pushing the boundaries of what we know about play. What can it be used for? How effective is it? Max is particularly interested in non-digital or hybrid digital and non-digital gaming for good. | | At Tiltfactor, Max has worked on the design team for... Read More →


Wednesday June 26, 2013 5:05pm - 5:35pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand
 
Thursday, June 27
 

9:00am

Healing and Health with Virtual Reality

For years, developers have strived to make immersive virtual worlds, and gamers have spent countless billions on the systems that play them best. Software, hardware, and input devices have all leapt forward, but the connection between the player and the virtual world has remained limited.

We've dreamed of stepping inside of our games, but the best we've been able to do is puppet characters through a tiny window! Until now. Technological progress in a variety of fields has finally brought immersive virtual reality within reach.

During this keynote, Oculus VR founder, and designer of the Oculus Rift VR headset, Palmer Luckey will talk about the intersection of body, mind, and virtual reality, and offer insights into how this new game technology can make a positive impact on the health of people and communities.


Speakers
PL

Palmer Luckey

Founder, OculusVR
OculusVR


Thursday June 27, 2013 9:00am - 9:45am
Room A: John Hancock Hall

9:50am

Erik Huey, Entertainment Software Association
The Entertainment Software Association (ESA) is the U.S. association exclusively dedicated to serving the business and public affairs needs of companies that publish computer and video games for video game consoles, personal computers, and the Internet.

Through its work on behalf of its members the ESA is increasingly involved in policy and development discussions concerning the use of games beyond entertainment.

Speakers
avatar for Erik Huey

Erik Huey

Senior Vice President for Government Affairs, Entertainment Software Association
Erik Huey is currently the Senior Vice President for Government Affairs at the Entertainment Software Association (ESA).  As Senior Vice President, Erik oversees the entire federal and state government relations operations of ESA. The Entertainment Software Association is the U.S. association dedicated to serving the business and public affairs needs of companies publishing interactive games for video game consoles, handheld devices... Read More →


Thursday June 27, 2013 9:50am - 10:05am
Room A: John Hancock Hall

10:05am

"Indie Game Health"
One of the interesting emergent areas in videogames today is the "independent games movement" a catch-all term used to romantically discuss everything from lone-wolf developers, to artists making games, to anti-establishment commercial ventures.  In reality it's about one important aspect of modern day game development : more people than ever, in more ways than ever, for more reasons than ever are making games.  And it is within these more self-motivated independent and hobbyist movements where you can find much of the recent richness of evolution for videogames across-the-board.

Health topics, themes, and initiatives are part of the massive explosion of independently produced games.  In this talk we will explore and highlight this work and within it find inspirations that will make us laugh, dream, and cry.  Drawing parallels with patient empowerment and advocacy efforts this journey into indie game health will yet again prove that when looking for the future of games for health you must always start by observing overall trends in videogames to begin with.

Speakers
avatar for Ben Sawyer

Ben Sawyer

Co-Founder, Digitalmill
Games for Health


Thursday June 27, 2013 10:05am - 10:45am
Room A: John Hancock Hall

11:00am

Access Granted: Exploring Videogames as a Therapeutic Tool for Children with Autism

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting approximately 1 in 88 individuals in the United States. General characteristics of ASD include deficits in verbal and nonverbal communication, social interaction, and restricted and repetitive behaviors and interests. Regardless of ASD symptoms, research indicates that individuals with this disorder prefer to engage with activities they find interesting and motivating.

During this talk research and findings will be presented developed by exploring both how and why individuals with ASD choose and interact with technology, especially popular media such as video games and the perceptions of their parents about games and related technologies. Attendees to this session will gain insight on how, and why games might be effective for children with Autism and the best paths to successfully addressing Autism populations with games.


Speakers
BH

Ben Hickerson

Penn State University
Penn State University


Thursday June 27, 2013 11:00am - 11:15am
Room D: Freedom Room

11:00am

Active Video Games for Healthy Aging
A major key to healthy aging is physical fitness. Despite the well-established benefits of regular physical activity 46 percent of adults aged 65 to 74, and 56 percent of adults over 75 engage in no leisure-time physical activity at all [1]. Therefore research is needed into strategies to increase participation and improve compliance with physical activity-based interventions for older people. Our study focuses on a new mode of physical activity: active video games. 

The intervention study is conducted at the Mayo Clinic Healthy Aging and Independent Living (HAIL) lab housed in Charter House, a continuing care retirement community in Rochester, Minn. Participants over 65 years of age living independently are recruited from this community. After instruction they gain unlimited, unsupervised access to the active video gaming system (Xbox Kinect) for a period of 12 weeks. The main focus of the study is their AVG behavior.

Though promising, research on active video games for seniors using affordable active gaming technology platforms is still in its infancy. There is a clear lack of rich or comprehensive models for understanding the basic experiences and processes for older persons. We are gathering rich, in-depth qualitative data on the active video gaming experience to better understand and make recommendations on how this new mode of physical activity can best be introduced and stimulated among seniors, as well as for whom it might be most suited.

Acknowledgements:This study is supported by the Mayo Clinic, TNO, VitaValley, the Noaber Foundation and the Dutch Ministries of Economic Affairs, Agriculture and Innovation (EL & I) and Health, Welfare and Sport (VWS)."

Speakers
avatar for Annerieke Heuvelink

Annerieke Heuvelink

Research Scientist, TNO
Cheery, researcher, driven, artificial intelligence, social, serious gaming, curious, creative, goal-directed, persuasive technologies, motivating, people person, full of energy! | | With a background in Artificial Intelligence I have a keen interest in using smart, human-inspired technology to support humans. My research inititally focused on the development of cognitive models and intelligent agents to support virtual training. From... Read More →


Thursday June 27, 2013 11:00am - 11:30am
Room E: Justice Room

11:00am

Bringing Action to Exergames for Children with Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy is a neurological disorder characterized by deficits in gross motor control and manual ability. Children with cerebral palsy often have difficulty engaging in casual exercise such as going for a bike ride or kicking around a ball with their friends. This can contribute to loss of mobility as the children grow.

Exergames, video games with an exercise component, represent a promising approach to helping children with CP to be more physically active. We have found that children with CP want to play fast-paced action videogames similar to those played by their friends without motor disabilities. This is particularly true of exergames, whose physical activity matches the fast-pace of action games. However, disabilities associated with CP can make it difficult to play action games.

Existing guidelines for developing games for people with motor disabilities can lead to slow-paced games that are accessible, but may lack the fun of fast-paced action games.

Through a year-long participatory design process with children with CP, we have discovered that it is in fact possible to develop action exergames for children with CP at level III on the Gross Motor Function Classification Scale.

We have developed and tested six fast-paced action exergames for children with CP. We have produced a revised set of design guidelines for games for children with CP, which retain the core principles of existing guidelines, while being compatible with fast-paced action.

The results of a follow up 8-week home trial showed high overall enjoyment and adherence. Players’ interest held up so strongly that more minutes were played in the final week than the first.


Speakers
avatar for Hamilton A Hernandez

Hamilton A Hernandez

PhD Student, Queen's University
I love exercise and used to be a hardcore gamer. Now I do research on exercise video games (exergames) for children with motor disabilities.


Thursday June 27, 2013 11:00am - 11:30am
Room B: Back Bay Grand

11:00am

GeckoCap : A Gamified Asthma Inhaler

Asthma is the most common chronic disease and one of the leading causes of hospitalization for American children. Nearly ten million– or one in seven– kids are affected by asthma. Worrisome for children and parents alike, asthma is also a pressing public health issue, costing the U.S. over $15 billion annually.

GeckoCap has developed mobile, digital, and smart tools that empower children as well as their parents and doctors to better manage asthma medication. GeckoCap’s glowing reminder system helps children build healthy habits and motivates them to take control of their health. With inhaler tracking, GeckoCap can also use inhaler activity to drive game-based experiences that can support managing asthma a collaborative effort, allowing parents and doctors to use games to drive adherence and behavior change in Asthma.


Thursday June 27, 2013 11:00am - 11:30am
Room C: Patriot Room

11:00am

Revisioning Re-Mission: Our Next Generation Health Game
In 2013 HopeLab is releasing Re-Mission 2, the follow-up to the groundbreaking 2006 video game for young people fighting cancer. Learn how brain science, an unconventional development model and candid feedback from young cancer patients led to this next-generation health game.

Speakers
avatar for Austin Harley

Austin Harley

Research and Game Development Associate, HopeLab
I am a runner, explorer, researcher, designer, and someone who loves playing games. I wear a lot of hats, and they generally fit well. My particular focus in work and design is conducting human centered research, combining it with relevant academic research, and translating that into fun and effective game design to improve health, self-efficacy, knowledge, and awareness. | | I believe games are powerful tools for change, especially when... Read More →
RT

Richard Tate

HopeLab
HopeLab


Thursday June 27, 2013 11:00am - 11:30am
Room A: John Hancock Hall

11:00am

Games for Health Theater
Thursday June 27, 2013 11:00am - 5:00pm
Room F: Liberty Room

11:15am

Assessing Play: Using Games to Diagnose Autism
Our aim is to replace the augment existing clinical methods for childhood diagnosis of Autism with a game-based solution.  The psychological and psychiatric clinicians have been the driving force behind our game because they are frustrated by the lack of ecological validity in the most widely used interview-based methodologies. Time and again, parents doubt that the answers children provided when presented with oral descriptions of social situations are accurately representative of what they have seen those children do in similar situations in real life.

Our system weaves assessment into a game environment. Scenes containing social challenges are populated with characters based on the child's gender and the choices the child makes for their visual appearance in terms of skin tone and race. These choices propagate through appearance, voicing, and diction across ten distinct social scenarios that assess how the child interacts and plays with virtual children. Thoughtfully dealing with these issues of race and gender is critical to our goal of an assessment tool that surpasses the ecological validity of existing methods.

This talk will have three areas of focus.  First, we describe the role of games in addressing social information processing issues like those faced by children on the Autism spectrum.  Second, we discuss design and coding considerations unique to this genre of game.  Third, we will describe preliminary clinical results gathered in early 2013 as this game is shared with both ASD and Typically Developing Children.

Speakers
NR

Nicole Russo-Ponsaran

Associate Research Director, Rush NeuroBehavioral Center, Rush University Medical Center
JT

Jim Thomas

Soar Technology
Soar Technology


Thursday June 27, 2013 11:15am - 11:30am
Room D: Freedom Room

11:45am

Space Ranger Alien Quest: A video game to promote executive function
Space Range Alien Quest is a computer-based action video game designed to assess and train a group of neuropsychological skills commonly referred to as executive functioning (EF) has been developed. EF is generally defined as a person’s ability to regulate cognitive processes, and encompasses the processes of shifting, updating and monitoring, and inhibition. 

Improved EF skills have been associated with a range of beneficial outcomes; such as academic performance (Gathercole et al., 2004), mental and physical health (Prince et al., 2007; Dunn, 2010). Research has shown great potential to train EF skills (Diamond & Lee, 2011; Thorell et al., 2009). Interventions using action video game play have proven to have beneficial effects on cognitive constructs including visuospatial attention and selective attention (Green and Bavelier 2006). However, no empirically validated video game targeted at promoting EF skills has yet been developed for intervention. 

In the Space Ranger Alien Quest game (SRAQ; http://games4health.psy.univie.ac.at/aliengame/) players take on the role of a Space Ranger, with the goal of taking care of all of the aliens that appear on-screen by giving them food and drink items. The game consisted of different types of aliens, which are identifiable through color and shape attributes. Participants are asked to match food or drink to the two different types of aliens (e.g., “Red aliens are hungry; blue aliens are thirsty”). Participants proceed to more difficult levels, during which the rules for matching are switched, such that aliens that previously were matched with food are now matched with drink, and vice versa (e.g., “Red aliens are now thirsty; blue aliens are hungry.”). Participants who initially fail repeated the level until they are successful in applying the rules for matching. Subsequent levels gradually increases in complexity, such that higher-order rules are introduced, indicated by background features of the screen (e.g., “During the day: red aliens are hungry; blue aliens are thirsty”, but “During the night: red aliens are thirsty; blue aliens are hungry”).  

This talk will discuss the game itself and recent research findings with close to 90 kids in a clinical trial of the game.

Speakers
avatar for Alexander Hofmann

Alexander Hofmann

Professor and director of the master degree programm Game Engineering and Simulation Technology, University of Applied Sciences Technikum Wien
Every child must have access to prevential psychological health training for it's own mental resilience!


Thursday June 27, 2013 11:45am - 12:05pm
Room E: Justice Room

11:45am

Games for a New Climate: An International Collaboration in Research and Design
Is play an effective vehicle for preparing for climate change? Can games be part of long-term strategies for better organizing volunteer-driven organizations? Do academic-driven research methods lead to field-ready tools? Over the last four years, Parsons The New School for Design’s PETLab has collaborated with the American Red Cross and the Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre to explore these and other questions. Games for a New Climate has produced games with ambitious goals: prepare communities at risk due to changes in the local climate; assist the Red Cross staff in training its volunteers; and help individuals and communities better forecast and plan for potential problems, including the implications of climate change on public health. John Sharp, PETLab’s co-director, will discuss the games the project has produced, the methodologies used for developing the games, and the successes and shortcomings of the project thus far.

Speakers
avatar for John Sharp

John Sharp

Associate Professor of Games and Learning, Parsons The New School of Design


Thursday June 27, 2013 11:45am - 12:30pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

11:45am

International Review: Europe
Exciting work in the games for health field is being done throughout Europe.  Working with our partners and community members in the region we’ve gathered together a summary of great research, projects, and games from the region.  We’ll also discuss the upcoming Games for Health Europe III which will take place in the Netherlands later in the fall of 2013.

Speakers
avatar for Jacqueline Cawston

Jacqueline Cawston

Programmes Director, Coventry University
My passion is creating projects that use technology in innovative imaginative ways. I started my career in graphics for BBC TV and then ran my own media company. Along the way I painted murals and headed up an adult brain injury rehab team as part of a wide ranging career portfolio, currently I am working for Coventry University. My projects include Shakespeare Byte Size with the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust and Mandela27 with Robben Island... Read More →
avatar for Mark Cottam

Mark Cottam

Vice President of Business Development, Serious Games International
Senior Executive with over 25 years of experience working with interactive entertainment and software companies. Currently, Mark is the Vice President of Business Development for Serious Games International and responsible for the North American market. Previously, Mark served as MumboJumbo’s Chief Executive Officer, responsible for the global operations of the business with a focus on retail and online sales. Under his direction, MumboJumbo... Read More →
avatar for Mark Stanger

Mark Stanger

Commercial Ops Director, Serious Games International
The power that GOOD video games design and development principles can bring to a much wider range of applications.


Thursday June 27, 2013 11:45am - 12:30pm
Room C: Patriot Room

11:45am

MalariaSpot: Building A Global Network of Virtual Malaria Hunters Through Gameplay

According to the World Health Organization approximately 216 million cases of malaria occur in the world and the disease kills about 655,000 people. Malaria is a treatable infectious disease transmitted by mosquitoes. Malaria is caused by a parasite called Plasmodium, which is transmitted via the bites of infected mosquitoes. In the human body, the parasites multiply in the liver, and then infect red blood cells.

Currently, “the gold standard” for malaria diagnosis worldwide consists of first detecting parasites and then counting the number of parasites in blood smears, manually through a microscope- usually the more the parasites more severe is the infection. An average of 100 images has to be visually checked by a specialist; a process that can take up to 30 minutes. Confirmation of a negative diagnosis is ultimately dependent on the technician’s expertise. In addition, over time, as malaria prevalence decreases, microscopy technician skills may be redeployed elsewhere.

Thus, we need scalable, fast, ubiquitous and accurate screening systems (a priority in the agenda for malaria eradication). Mobile phone coverage is reaching every corner of the planet and we see the global connectivity as an opportunity to distribute the images all over the internet.

We believe that there is so much on-line talent out there that can be used to analyze malaria images (while you play a game!). To start with, we have developed the MalariaSpot game. During the game, we will log all the player clicks (scores) – both parasites accurately hunted and mistakes – so the analysis of all the games played will allow us to learn (a) how fast and accurate is the parasite counting of non-expert microscopy players, (b) how to combine the analysis of different players to obtain accurate results as good as the ones provided by expert microscopists.


Speakers
avatar for Miguel A. Luengo-Oroz

Miguel A. Luengo-Oroz

MalariaSpot.org - Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, CEI Moncloa
[Games + Crowdsourcing + Artificial Intelligence + Mobile Technologies + Image Analysis + Diagnostics + Global Health + Big Data + People] | | Antidisciplinary scientist working on crowdsourcing, gamification and data science for global challenges in international development and global health. Currently, research fellow in Innovative Health at the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid –founder of malariaspot.org - and the chief of research... Read More →


Thursday June 27, 2013 11:45am - 12:30pm
Room A: John Hancock Hall

11:45am

Transforming social emotional learning into effective, engaging game platforms

At 3-C, we focus on creating evidence-based games for social emotional health.

 

This session will detail three of our game-based products, each of which employs a distinct learning model, along with the research we've conducted on these games with funding from public and private sources (www.3ctechnologies.com/games). 

 

These include:

•             Zoo U: an intelligent social skills tutoring product built on a criterion-based mastery model

•             Adventures Aboard the S.S.GRIN:  intelligent social problem solving software that builds social emotional skills through self-guided exploration and application in the virtual story world

•             Stories in Motion:  visual narrative software that enables users to visualize successful social paths through difficult social challenges

 

Specifically, we'll address how we've learned to build these types of games and what other organizations seeking to build social emotional skill building games for children should be thinking about.  Attendees to this session will learn about 3-C, but more importantly will learn how iterative testing with end users can be embedded into the development process to build games that are not only effective for promoting social emotional health, but also engaging for target end users.


Speakers
ME

Melissa E. DeRosier

3-C Institute for Social Development
3-C Institute for Social Development


Thursday June 27, 2013 11:45am - 12:30pm
Room D: Freedom Room

12:10pm

SPARX : A Game for Depression
This talk will highlight SPARX, a game developed to combat mild to moderate depression in teens. Results from a randomized clinical trial published in the British Medical Journal demonstrated that treatment with SPARX was as effective as care usually given, typically face-to-face therapy, in reducing depression among adolescents with mild to moderate depression. 

During this talk LinkedWellness which is working to develop the U.S. market for SPARX will demonstrate the game, discuss how it works, and how they plan to build a sustainable delivery and business model around the game.

Speakers
DB

David Burt

David Burt founded LinkedWellness.com with Frank Otenasek to bring the best e-therapies to people suffering from behavioral health conditions. Prior to founding LinkedWellness, Mr. Burt was the CEO of two publicly-traded companies: Ergo Science, a Boston biotech company that developed a new drug for type 2 diabetes that is now FDA approved and on the market with a superior cardiovascular profile; and Lyris, Inc. a San Francisco based internet... Read More →


Thursday June 27, 2013 12:10pm - 12:35pm
Room E: Justice Room

12:30pm

Lunch
Thursday June 27, 2013 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Room E: Justice Room

12:30pm

Lunch
Thursday June 27, 2013 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Room D: Freedom Room

12:30pm

Lunch
Thursday June 27, 2013 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Room A: John Hancock Hall

12:30pm

Lunch
Thursday June 27, 2013 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Room C: Patriot Room

12:30pm

Lunch
Thursday June 27, 2013 12:30pm - 1:30pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

1:30pm

New Ideas for Pervasive Exergaming

Exergaming is a stalwart genre in commercial game circles now. Extensions into schools have become regular forays of companies often as adjuncts to P.E. class curriculums. Despite all the activity there remains a large gap between the capabilities and sales of exergames as a commercial category and their scaled and applicable uses in organizations such as schools, and even enterprises.

This session gathers two projects and a leading researcher together to explore new concepts in exergaming. Pervasive exergaming imagines a world where the distance between any one user and a beneficial exergaming experience is reduced to 0. There is no major equipment to be secured. Experiences are tied together across modalities and locations and the gamut of activities and presentations moves beyond just a fitness oriented dipiction.

Attendees to this session will get an overview of where exergaming stands today and what sorts of new trends may be signaling innovation and opportunities to reduce the barriers to exergaming reaching its potential. This review will then give way to presentations by two projects that are looking to break exergaming into new forms and platforms.

HealthTeacher is using purposely simple game concepts delivered over the Web to classrooms to create easily deployable movement games into schools that can be played outside distinct periods of P.E.

Fitness Interactive eXperience is creating a browser based experience that acts as a delivery platform of exergame experiences to end users across multiple population types to become a system that could stitch together many distinct forms of exergaming together.


Speakers
JH

John Herbold

VP of Product, GoNoodle
We're building a gaming platform powered by physical activity that lets teachers create more productive learners while at the same time helping kids get more exercise.
MT

Mike Tinney

CEO and Founder, FIX: Fitness Interactive eXperience
Games are in Mike Tinney’s DNA. His career began in game design (if not exactly the kind of games you think of today) with his first job being to run weekend-long murder mystery themed events at hotels and resorts in the Northeast prior to “the internet.” After his company was merged into White Wolf, a creative publishing house, Mike spent the next 13 years in a variety of roles that included game design, licensing, marketing and business... Read More →
avatar for Stephen P. Yang, Ph.D.

Stephen P. Yang, Ph.D.

Researcher & Lecturer, Exergame Lab & SUNY Cortland
Researching how gaming and technology can improve health.


Thursday June 27, 2013 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Room D: Freedom Room

1:30pm

The Aligning Forces for Quality Games for Data Challenge : Meet the Finalists

In late 2012 The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Aligning Forces for Quality national program launched a development challenge to spawn ideas around using gaming and gamification concepts to generate health data that can be incorporated into the Aligning Forces data set. Gamification has been an increasingly hot topic in the health space, but seldom have games been used for the express purpose of creating data to improve the health and the quality of care in a community (big or small).

This session covers the creation of that challenge and how it unfolded.  Each of five finalists for the two-part challenge will also be presented.  See how five different teams are attacking the problem space the challenge seeks to answer.

Not only will audience members learn about a unique opportunity for games and data in health & healthcare but. as the final submission date for the remaining five competitors is roughly four weeks after the Games for Health Conference there is a chance to offer feedback and comments to each finalist that may help them win one of the remaining three top prizes from the challenge.

Come join the Health 2.0 Development Challenge team and each finalist for a session about data, games, and the difficult challenge of engaging and enhancing outcomes around health quality.


Moderators
avatar for Jean-Luc Neptune

Jean-Luc Neptune

Senior Vice President, Health20
Jean-Luc (“JL”) Neptune is Senior Vice President at Health 2.0 and Director of the Health 2.0 Developer Challenge program. Health 2.0’s Developer Challenge Platform is a virtual technology infrastructure that provides organizations the ability to run innovation competitions to crowdsource solutions to complex health issues. Health 2.0 has run over 50 challenges and offered over $4,000,000 in prizes to a network of 7,000 developers... Read More →

Thursday June 27, 2013 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Room C: Patriot Room

1:30pm

Budgets, Tactics & Production: Getting Your Game Built

Developing games is difficult, requiring management of many moving parts, and the ability to consistently recalibrate activity around your core vision.  Like many serious game fields, the games for health field has many active projects and teams that are entirely new to the idea of building a game.

This Games for Health Conference Roundtable is designed for veteran and rookies alike to discuss the art and science of getting their games built, and built purposely for health outcomes.

Come swap stories, offer advice, and ask questions that can help make the difference immediately in your current and future projects.


Thursday June 27, 2013 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Room E: Justice Room

1:30pm

ESCoNS Report Out

While still an early and young field activity toward game-based neurotherapeutics is growing with a growing base of researchers and startup activity.  The Entertainment Software and Cognitive Neurotherapeutics Society held its second annual conference earlier in 2013 at USC’s School for Cinematic Arts.  This 2.5 day event brought together leading neuroscientists and game developers to discuss the frontiers of game-based cognitive neurotherapeutics.

During this hour long presentation ESCoNS founding member Dr. Adam Gazzaley will provide not only a summary of the talks and events that took place at ESCoNS but also offer some perspective on this emerging sector of games+cognitive & emotional health.


Speakers

Thursday June 27, 2013 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

1:30pm

Looking Back at PlayForward: A Post-Mortem Panel of Designers, Developers & Researchers

PlayForward: Elm City Stories is an iPad-based game designed to help youth at-risk for HIV and STD infections.  The game was produced over the course of a 18 month period and is now completed and in the course of a randomize clinical trial with after-school youth in New Haven, CT.

The game is designed to integrate risk reduction skills with social learning narratives with the hope that the acqusition of skills, practicing of behaviors, and exposure to important narratives can help youth better negotiate risky situations related to early sexual activity.  Such risks can include early drug and alcohol use, poor STD knowledge and preparedness, blind risk taking, and more.

PlayForward’s design process was extremely rigorous and involved multiple designers, developers, and researchers working together as a team to produce a game that has over 1000 individual pieces of content organized across four mini-game sections, a large-scale narrative structure, and an aspirational avatar model designed to improve self-esteem and longitudinal life orientation.

During this session members of the PlayForward design, research, and development team will gather for a frank and open discussion of the game’s development, covering the beginning, middle, and completion focusing on both the high-points, low-points, and still active wishlists that all games have when completed.

During the post-mortem conversation hundreds of slides will cycle behind the team providing a glimpse into some of the game’s early artwork tests, content trials, and even some of the best emails, and memo highlights that will be taken from an trove of over 1000+ pages of content the team is currently cataloguing for future archiving.

Attendees will see a major game for health effort laid bare, learn tips and tricks that only get learned from the crucible of actual development.  You will have a chance to get a sense of the creativity and sacrifices needed to build a health behavior game from scratch that comprises over 12 hours of gameplay built on a tight budget.


Speakers
SC

Sabrina Culyba

Senior Game Designer, Schell Games
Schell Games
avatar for Lynn Fiellin

Lynn Fiellin

Associate Professor of Medicine, Yale University School of Medicine
Risk reduction and prevention in youth and young adults
avatar for Ben Sawyer

Ben Sawyer

Co-Founder, Digitalmill
Games for Health


Thursday June 27, 2013 1:30pm - 2:20pm
Room A: John Hancock Hall

2:30pm

Games for Health Journal: Speak with the editor
Games for Health Journal, published by Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., Publisher, is in its second year of publication.  Tom Baranowski, PhD, was named Editor-in-Chief as of Volume 2, Issue 2.  Tom will present some statistics about the journal and plans for the near future.  This is primarily an opportunity to ask the Editor about the Journal and getting articles published in it.

Speakers
TB

Tom Baranowski

Professor of Pediatrics, Baylor College of Medicine
Games for Health Journal


Thursday June 27, 2013 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Room E: Justice Room

2:30pm

Brush Off - The experimental toothbrushing videogame

Brush Off is a game that teaches young kids about maintaining great oral health and oral health habits.  Oral health habits are formed between ages five and six, hence Brush Off addresses these children. This collaboration brought together researchers to focus on psychology, visual perception, motor skills and attention while designers focused on character, song and gameplay.

See how we combined motion interfaces with health behavior theory and fun music to create a new tool to improve kids attitudes and behaviors around oral health.


Speakers
JM

Joyce Marie Flores

Old Dominion University
Old Dominion University
avatar for Dov Jacobson

Dov Jacobson

Managing Director, GamesThatWork
GamesThatWork works with creative scientists, practitioners and administrators to make meaningful games. The studio's values have been refined by eleven years of collaboration with these committed individuals. | | A GamesThatWork game offers more than facile badgification or a simple edutainment. It is a unique design whose mechanics illuminate the learning objectives and allow players to exercise new behaviors. Its win conditions guide the... Read More →
JJ

Jesse Jacobson

Games that Work


Thursday June 27, 2013 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Room A: John Hancock Hall

2:30pm

Sector Spotlight: Nutrition Games

To date there have been dozens of games of nutrition and it is now a genre within the games for health field that features constant activity.  This talk provides a dive into the nutrition games scene within the games for health field.

During the talk attendees will hear more A heavy focus will be on recent developments over the last year and research that has published or taken place to better our understanding of how to use games to help people make better choices about food, cooking, and eating.


Speakers
avatar for Catherine Frederico

Catherine Frederico

President, Frederico Arts LLC; Adjunct Professor Newbury College, Regis College, Frederico Arts LLC
Catherine Frederico, MS RD LDN is a registered dietitian and adjunct professor at both Regis College and Newbury College in Massachusetts, as well as President of Frederico Arts LLC. She holds a BS degree in Biological Health/Nutrition Science from The Pennsylvania State University, and an MS in Foods & Nutrition from Arizona State University. For 13 years Catherine was a renal dietitian, and then specialized in pediatric and fitness nutrition... Read More →


Thursday June 27, 2013 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Room D: Freedom Room

2:30pm

There is a Prize for That: A Review of Games for Health Development Contests

Over the past few years the idea of prize-based incentives for innovation has grown exponentially.  This is quite true in emerging areas of practice such as Games for Health.  The use of such methods is increasing, and we can expect more of it in the games for health field especially.

This panel gathers together recent users of prize-based contests, challenges, and game/idea jams to discuss their own specific stories and results and identify recommendations and best practices for the future.

Attendees considering using, or responding to these types of initiatives will gain insights that may prove helpful to creating or entering such endeavors.


Speakers
avatar for Alex Chisholm

Alex Chisholm

Executive Director, Learning Games Network
Alex Chisholm is a media research and development practitioner who is passionate about transforming education for learners of all ages. As Executive Director and a founding member of the Learning Games Network, a non-profit spin-off of the MIT Education Arcade, he oversees the organization's program development and collaborations to bridge the gaps between research and practice in game-based learning. In recent years, he has developed and... Read More →
avatar for Drew Crecente

Drew Crecente

Executive Director, Jennifer Ann's Group
Jennifer Ann's Group
avatar for Jean-Luc Neptune

Jean-Luc Neptune

Senior Vice President, Health20
Jean-Luc (“JL”) Neptune is Senior Vice President at Health 2.0 and Director of the Health 2.0 Developer Challenge program. Health 2.0’s Developer Challenge Platform is a virtual technology infrastructure that provides organizations the ability to run innovation competitions to crowdsource solutions to complex health issues. Health 2.0 has run over 50 challenges and offered over $4,000,000 in prizes to a network of 7,000 developers... Read More →


Thursday June 27, 2013 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Room C: Patriot Room

2:30pm

What we've learned from casual games and where we're going with defense games

East Carolina University's Psychophysiology Lab was first to establish the mood altering and cognitive effects of casual video games using unique psychophysiological and neuroendocrine methods.  Simultaneously, we were developing new biofeedback techniques to use with returning Wounded Warrior Marines. We learned how to incorporate sensor technology and biofeedback techniques into casual video games. Preliminary data indicated "biofeedback games" could exercise the autonomic nervous system, increasing its control and subsequently decreasing stress and improving overall performance. These developments have led to 3 current Department of Defense (Telemedicine and Technology Research Center) grants designed to develop a (game based) naturalistic assessment for head trauma and biofeedback games for the Warfighter for preventing stress related conditions such as PTSD.


Speakers
avatar for Matt Fish

Matt Fish

Doctoral Graudate Assistant, East Carolina University
My name is Matt Fish and I am a doctoral graduate research assistant at East Carolina University's Biofeedback and Psychophysiology lab. My master and undergraduate work is in recreational therapy. My doctoral program is in addictions and rehabilitation counseling. I am licensed in recreational therapy and board certified in biofeedback. Additionally, I am pursuing a licensed professional counselor credential. For my master's thesis, I... Read More →
BL

Brenton Laing

East Carolina University
Eastern Carolina University
avatar for Carmen Russoniello, PhD

Carmen Russoniello, PhD

Professor, East Carolina University


Thursday June 27, 2013 2:30pm - 3:10pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

3:20pm

CogCubed: Using Sifteo Cubes for Diagnosing Cognitive Disorders

CogCubed has created an innovative game, built on a new interactive tangible-graphical gaming platform called Sifteo Cubes, designed to help in diagnosing cognitive disorders like Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and common comorbidities like Depression, Anxiety, and Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). This new game, called Groundskeeper, provides a new approach to diagnostics.

Through this novel video game, data is tracked and stored at sub-second intervals. Traditional response measurements are captured in addition to new information, such as inter-response metrics. Through a clinical trial at the University of Minnesota, the efficacy of the game was evaluated. Novel data mining techniques were then applied to build several predictive models. We will explain this game, the Big Data captured, the predictive models, and the results of the study. Further, we will explain how this tool, which functions as a game, can be used to improve the diagnosis of cognitive disorders and the broader potential for patients.


Speakers
avatar for Monika Heller

Monika Heller

Child/Adolescent Psychiatrist, CogCubed
CogCubed
avatar for Kurt Roots

Kurt Roots

Founder and CEO, CogCubed
Every week, people from around the world spend more than 3 billion hours playing video games. And today, modern games can solve real world problems through the evolution of game platform technology with intersections of data analytics, game design, and health. That is why we are developing games; to make people better. It is how we can change the world and use just some of that 3 billion hours to make games a positive reality.
JS

Jaideep Srivastava

CogCubed
CogCubed


Thursday June 27, 2013 3:20pm - 3:50pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

3:20pm

Depression Quest
Depression Quest is an award-winning game made to illustrate what people living with a mental illness experience. Come see how we made it, what it is, and what has happened since we’ve released it.

Speakers
ZQ

Zoe Quinn

Irrelevant Games
Irrelevant Games


Thursday June 27, 2013 3:20pm - 3:50pm
Room E: Justice Room

3:20pm

Eyewire: A Game to Map the Brain
EyeWire is a game to map the brain. We are an online community of over 50,000 people from 100 countries — citizen neuroscientists — who map the 3D structure of neurons and discover neural connections. By joining EyeWire, players help map connections between retinal neurons. This information advances neuroscience research on how the retina functions in visual perception. Playing also helps the EyeWire team, based at MIT, develop computational technologies for mapping the connectome.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Robinson

Amy Robinson

Creative Director, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
“If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.” John Q. Adams | | | | Time is limited..work and play hard! "every morning is the sunny end of last night."


Thursday June 27, 2013 3:20pm - 3:50pm
Room A: John Hancock Hall

3:20pm

Help My Avatar is Sick: The Role of Avatars in Games for Health

Building and updating on previous work presented at past games for health conferences this session delves into the various forms and functions that personal avatars are playing in games and especially in health and behavior.

Providing both recent research findings, and in-game examples the talk will cover ideas for avatar system design, and in-game use.

Attendees to the session will not only learn about underlying theories and outcomes from in-game avatars, but also creative approaches and uses that go beyond the mere idea of a human form embedded in a game world.


Thursday June 27, 2013 3:20pm - 3:50pm
Room C: Patriot Room

3:20pm

ViziCal: Real- Time Energy Expenditure Prediction for Exergaming Activities

In recent years, exercise games have been criticized for not being able to engage their players into levels of physical activity that are high enough to yield significant health benefits. A major challenge in the design of exergames, however, is that it is difficult to precisely assess the amount of physical activity an exergame yields due to limitations of existing techniques to assess energy expenditure of exergaming activities. With recent advances in commercial depth sensing technology to accurately track players’ motions in 3D, this talk will present a technique called Vizical that uses state-of the art regression algorithms to accurately predict energy expenditure in real time. Vizical may allow for designing exergames that are more vigorous to play and stimulate larger health benefits or exergames that can precisely burn a specific amount of calories in a given time.


Speakers
avatar for Eelke Folmer

Eelke Folmer

Associate Professor, University of Nevada, Reno
I research exercise games for children who are blind. | I like kitesurfing, snowboarding and gardening. | | My lab developed a new technique, called Vizical, for precisely assessing how many calories you burn when you play exercise games. Vizical may help design games that engage players in higher levels of physical activity and that yield larger health benefits. | | Looking for investors/collaborators.


Thursday June 27, 2013 3:20pm - 3:50pm
Room D: Freedom Room

4:00pm

Virulent & Progenator X : Using Games to Explore the Science of Biology & Health
The University of Wisconsin’s Games, Learning, and Society Lab (GLS) has created and distributed several games that focus on explaining key biological concepts to the public-at-large. This session features demonstrations of those projects, how they came to be, and what was learned by creating and releasing them.

Thursday June 27, 2013 4:00pm - 4:30pm
Room A: John Hancock Hall

4:00pm

Players, Metrics & Markets: How Social Apps, Games, and Gamified Systems Are Driving Digital Health

This session looks at the growing world of social & mobile apps and games that are growing fast and establishing a spectrum of activity from gamification to full games.  In many cases these efforts lie at the powerful intersection of players, metrics, and markets that many of the startup efforts in this field are trying to identify and optimize for success.

During this talk we’ll look at the gamut of activity in the mobile/social space that is a heterogeneous mix of apps, gamification, and games.  We’ll delineate between what is work, what is emerging, and what seems to be failing in general and specifically some of the leading subareas in games for health like fitness, neurogaming, and chronic disease management.

Special attention will be given to the underlying aspect of data analytics that are at play in this space (and increasingly across all games) and what you can do to adopt the best identified practices.  Finally, the talk will close with an analysis of the business models and funding to date.


Speakers
avatar for Dr. Bonnie Feldman

Dr. Bonnie Feldman

Principal, Dr Bonnie 360
DrBonnie360’s mission is to create a digitally connected world of personalized care for autoimmune patients.  | Driven by personal and professional passion, she uses 21st Century technology to raise awareness about the invisible autoimmune epidemic and to build bridges across the abyss of slow diagnosis and disappointing treatment. | Bonnie is an invited speaker for SXSW, Stanford Medicine X, Bio-IT, Data to Drugs to Diagnostics, StrataRx... Read More →


Thursday June 27, 2013 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room C: Patriot Room

4:00pm

The Frontlines of Implementation: A Discussion of When Games for Health are Actually in Use

As games for health move more into the market, the reality of the hard work of getting it used by target customers and facilitators begins.  Outside of many pilots, and a few successful direct-to-consumer efforts, little knowledge has been collectively captured about frontline implementation — especially at scale.  Most importantly, can we describe strategies and approaches that not only scale sales, but also impact?

This roundtable discussion at Games for Health is designed to begin capturing and nurturing best practices concerning implementation of finished games in health situations.  Be they games used by therapists, directly by users, in schools, after school programs, prescribed by doctors, used by coaches, and more, how is this being done and what are the unmet needs of this crucial last mile for games for health developers?

Join us for perhaps the most important roundtable to the future of games for health as it moves out of the labs, startups, and development studios of years past into the hands of people in need.


Thursday June 27, 2013 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room E: Justice Room

4:00pm

Two Board Games for Health: Monster Appetite & Aligning Forces for Quality

Increasingly we are seeing game designers move back and forth between paper and electronic forms and cross-pollinating ideas between the two modalities. While Games for Health focuses heavily on computer-game based projects this session looks at two recently developed board games designed to address issues in health & healthcare.

Monster Appetite addresses the obesity epidemic, one of America’s largest public health challenges, now growing in the rest of the world.

In light of efforts to combat the obesity epidemic, Monster Appetite (MA) is a game that potentially remediates some aspects of the concern by promoting awareness of the content of food typically consumed by children.

The Aligning Forces For Quality game is a new game project focusing on how to help groups seeking to improve healthcare quality across many regions of the country. The project is a collaboration between Dartmouth College’s Tiltfactor Lab, Digitalmill, and The Robert Wood Johnson Foundations Aligning Forces for Quality National Program.

In each case presenters will discuss the design work involved in each game and how it is being rolled out to their target communities. Discussion about how the ideas might translate into computerized forms and whether such ideas provide useful advantages (or not) will also take place.


Speakers
MH

Maria Hwang

Higher Education Institution, Teachers College, Columbia University
Teachers College, Columbia University
MS

Max Seidman

Game Designer, Tiltfactor
Max is a game designer at Tiltfactor, the game design and research lab for social change located at Dartmouth College. Tiltfactor is dedicated to using games for purposes beyond just fun, and pushing the boundaries of what we know about play. What can it be used for? How effective is it? Max is particularly interested in non-digital or hybrid digital and non-digital gaming for good. | | At Tiltfactor, Max has worked on the design team for... Read More →


Thursday June 27, 2013 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room D: Freedom Room

4:00pm

Zombies, Cardio, and Sitting Disease : Expanding Active Games into Frames beyond Fitness
This session features four different projects taking exergaming and active gaming into new directions.

The Return of “Zombie Yoga” – Introducing Emotions Into Motion Gaming

Last year we debuted Zombie Yoga in an initial talk at the Games for Health Conference 2012.  This year the zombies return…

After a full year of Development at DePaul University, “”Zombie Yoga – Recovering the Inner Child”" has been completed. The team set out to develop a different kind of motion game: one in which the emotional aspect of playing the game is foregrounded and physical exercise is only regarded as a vehicle of interaction.

This talk introduces the finished game and provides insight into its design process: the decisions that were made to create an emotionally driven motion game, whose main focus was on inner processes rather than heart-rate, oxygen levels and work-out. It discusses the potential benefits of focusing on these psychological rather than physical themes for the purpose of reaching and audience who does not already have an affinity towards exercising. 

Supporting Therapists In Motion-Based Gaming For Brain Injury Rehabilitation
To create and design games that support therapists in their work with brain-injury patients we need to (a) better understand the scope of the problem space and (b) consider both the tangible outcomes (e.g., meeting therapeutic goals) and the experiential outcomes (e.g. increased patient confidence). We feel that all too often in games for therapy, game are designed for tangible outcomes (i.e. more related to productivity tools) than for experiential outcomes.  This talk discusses these issues informs attendees on the design and user requirements for adjustable mini motion-games to support BI therapies. 

Cardioactive : An experimental full body exergame
According to the latest Pentagon figures, more than one-third of the roughly 31.2 million Americans aged 17 to 24 are unqualified for military service because of physical and medical issues, mostly due to obesity. CardioActive, an Entertainment Technology Center student project, is working with The United States Army in association with The Telemedicine & Advanced Technology Research Center (TATRC) to help solve this problem.

During this session attendees will learn about the Cardioactive project and see a demonstration of an experimental exercise game. Our goal with this game was to not only make something that was fun to play, but also something that would use biofeedback to help drive the game play. In the video game, participants will hover through a subway tunnel shooting robot spiders. The game is designed around a ten minute fitness routine that gets people moving in a short amount of time.

Come see what we built, hear our story, and provide feedback to the project.

The American Heart Association Gets Up Offa Their Things with Hotseat
A year ago, Hotseat presented a prototype here at Games for Health. Today, Hotseat's back to share its journey from prototype to finished product, from untested to piloted, and with an organization whose mission perfectly aligns with Hotseat's: the American Heart Association (AHA).

Now linked through research to an increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, kidney disease, cancer, and more, "sitting disease" is recognized by public health officials, researchers and employers as a real health concern. Hotseat is a customizable, user-driven answer to this threat. Hotseat is a mobile- and web-based solution that decreases employees' sitting time through short breaks, social accountability and game play. Described as a "trainer in one's pocket" and "Pandora for exercise," Hotseat has been recognized for its design by the Webbys People's Voice Awards and Partners Healthcare Innovators Challenge. 

At the time of the conference, Hotseat will be at the midpoint of a two-month pilot with AHA employees and guests. Session attendees will hear what we've learned and what's surprised us, too. We'll review data from AHA's pilot, including baseline sedentary behavior and current utilization overall and by age, gender, and other demographics. We'll share what goes into a successful launch and what it takes to sustain engagement and track impact. And we'll highlight the necessary decision points for moving a product forward while balancing product enhancement.
 

Speakers
avatar for fran melmed

fran melmed

CEO/Founder, context communication consulting
Owner of context communication consulting, a communication and change management consulting firm that specializes in workplace wellness. Co-founder of #co_health workplace wellness community and CoHealth Checkup, a monthly radio program on workplace wellness (@co_health). Creator of Hotseat, a mobile- and web-based tool to get us up and moving (GetHotseatApp.com). | | Passionate about: Food, Film, Fino, Fitness.
avatar for Cynthia Putnam

Cynthia Putnam

Assistant Professor, DePaul University, College of Computing and Digital Media
I have over ten years industry experience as a designer creating 2D/3D art, interfaces, game activities and other interactive systems. I received my PhD in Human Centered Design and Engineering from the University of Washington, and now work as an assistant professor at DePaul (College of Computing and Digital Media), where I teach in the HCI and Games programs. | | My current research is focused in two areas: | (1) Motion-based... Read More →
avatar for Doris Rusch

Doris Rusch

Chicago, IL, USA, DePaul University
The human condition is extremely fascinating to me: what makes us tick? What's the spectrum of our emotions? How do we make sense of our experiences and share them with others? Games are a great medium to create shared experiences related to the human condition. One of my main areas of exploration related to that are mental health issues and the use of metaphors to make abstract ideas tangible. I made a few metaphorical games about addiction... Read More →


Thursday June 27, 2013 4:00pm - 5:00pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

4:30pm

Improving emotional well-being one scientifically proven app and game at a time.

ORCAS has 20 years of experience conducting extensive behavioral research that addresses modern health and wellness challenges. Michael Mulvihill will discuss how ORCAS applies scientifically-proven research to the design and development of apps that help people manage their healthcare and change their behavior in healthy, meaningful, personally relevant ways. Michael will highlight several evidence-based apps developed and studied in randomized clinical trials by ORCAS, among them MoodHacker, a mobile app supporting depression self-management.

Attendees of this lecture will have a better understanding of:

• The challenges of self-management in today’s healthcare environment

• How ORCAS is applying gamification, personal user recommendations, and persuasive design to address challenges of user experience and engagement

• How to maintain scientific integrity and produce successful outcomes in product development

The goal of ORCAS is to demonstrate long-term behavior change through evidence based outcomes. The result is improved health for individuals, which can drive down individual costs and costs to organizations when adopted by health care systems. 


Speakers
avatar for Michael Mulvihill

Michael Mulvihill

CEO, ORCAS
Helping people self manage their health and well-being using technology, game dynamics and mobile strategies to feel better and more inspired about life. Love hiking, reading, landscaping and thinking.


Thursday June 27, 2013 4:30pm - 5:00pm
Room A: John Hancock Hall

5:15pm

How A Mobile Game (and Zombies!) got 500,000 People Running for Their Lives!

Six to Start and author Naomi Alderman combine the emotional power of world-class storytelling with next-generation media to make unforgettable games and experiences.

Arguably the best mobile exergame to date, Zombies, Run! has sold over 400,000 copies and has seen fans of the game from around the world use it as a key part of their outdoor and indoor exercise routine.

This Keynote presentation by members of Six to Start’s Zombies, Run! team will delve into the inside story of the game’s development. From its successful Kickstarter debut to its current bestselling status on leading mobile platforms, you’ll get it all – with zombies included.


Speakers
avatar for Naomi Alderman

Naomi Alderman

Co-creator and Lead Writer, Zombies, Run!
I'm a novelist and games writer/designer. I love making games that don't make you hate yourself for playing them. And I love making a project that gets people up out of their chairs - because I know how hard that can be to do!
avatar for Adrian Hon

Adrian Hon

CEO and Co-Founder, Six to Start
Adrian Hon is co-founder and CEO at Six to Start, creators of gamelike stories and story-like games including the world's bestselling smartphone fitness game, Zombies, Run! with over two million players. Six to Start's clients have included Disney, the BBC, Channel 4, and Penguin, and the company has won multiple awards including Best of Show at SXSW. | Originally trained as a neuroscientist at Cambridge, UCSD, and Oxford, Adrian is the author... Read More →


Thursday June 27, 2013 5:15pm - 6:00pm
Room A: John Hancock Hall
 
Friday, June 28
 

9:00am

The Reimagination of Healthcare
The Creative Destruction of the healthcare industry is underway and the conditions are ripe for an epic decade of disruption caused by Healthcare Transformers building games for health.

Speakers
avatar for Steven H. Krein

Steven H. Krein

Co-founder & CEO, StartUp Health
Steven Krein is the Co-founder and CEO of StartUp Health, an Academy to inspire, educate, and provide resources for entrepreneurs to build sustainable health and wellness companies. | | Steven is on a mission to accelerate technology innovations in health and wellness that help lower the costs and improve the quality of health care in our country. The firm was founded on the belief that successful health and wellness companies are the result... Read More →


Friday June 28, 2013 9:00am - 9:45am
Room A: John Hancock Hall

10:00am

Collaboration tactics: Finding talent, experts, and partners

Games for Health is a multi-disciplinary field comprised of many talents.  This roundtable is designed by request of past attendees to provide two important services:

1. Provide a space at The Games for Health Conference for people seeking collaborators and partners to meetup and more efficiently find each other.

2. Provide a space for dialogue about how to find and engage experts, talent, and partners in general.

The creation of great game projects require bringing together teams of great diversity, expertise, and commitment.  It is the one practice that can be better defined, and repeated that is closest to a recipe for success in this field.  Using that key element as a guiding principle come join this roundtable for a great discussion of best practices and needs.


Friday June 28, 2013 10:00am - 10:45am
Room E: Justice Room

10:00am

Meetup: Exergaming & Sensorimotor Rehab Developers & Researchers

In years past the Exergaming and Sensorimotor Rehab tracks and communities have been a backbone to the games for health field and Games for Health conference.  With our new structure we’ve removed the tracks that brought these communities together to make room for more shared needs and crossover discussions.  However, it is important that some of the biggest and most advanced communities within the greater games for health field have spaces to gather, network, and explore freely issues that are specific to them.

This scheduled session provides a time and place for both communities interested in games and interfaces for physical activity related health to gather and talk openly.



Speakers
SF

Sheryl Flynn

Blue Marble Game Co.
Blue Marble Game Co.


Friday June 28, 2013 10:00am - 10:45am
Room F: Liberty Room

10:00am

How we approach innovation & games at Kaiser
For more than 60 years, Kaiser Permanente has provided quality health care to millions of Americans.  This talk focuses on how Kaiser pursues internal research and development for producing innovative solutions for its members.  This includes many forms of interactive health for therapy and behavior change such as apps, Web communities and games.

Organizations interested in adopting games and other novel forms of health interventions as forms of innovation will learn the processes that Kaiser uses to build these efforts AND internal capacity to support further development beyond the prototyping stage.  Developers will learn about how large organizations might work with them to develop new capabilities and projects, and the approaches that might work for them as they seek to collaborate with organizations such as Kaiser.

Speakers
avatar for Christine Folck

Christine Folck

Lead Innovation Designer, Kaiser Permanente IT
Hi. I am the Lead Innovation Designer with Kaiser's Innovation and Advanced Technology group. Bascially I lead team's in designing new technologies to improve patient care specifically and healthcare in general. I love my job -- I get to play all day! I have been in this role for just over a year. Prior to my current role I was an Innovation Advisor with Kaiser's Innovation Consultancy group. Overall I have worked with Kaiser for almost... Read More →


Friday June 28, 2013 10:00am - 10:45am
Room A: John Hancock Hall

10:00am

Markets & Opportunities : A Summary & Outlook for Business Development

As the games for health field matures from its earliest beginnings we’re beginning to see real commercial activity take hold.  In this talk by the co-founder of The Games for Health Project we’ll walk through all the different markets in the field and identify the ones that are really taking hold and what the state of each one is.

Throughout the talk we’ll also identify the best near term and future opportunities that exist and how the changing nature of hardware, software, health, and game development is making exciting new ideas possible.

Attendees to this session will leave with a great understanding of the markets in games for health, where the most robust opportunities exist, and how to approach these opportunities best.


Speakers
avatar for Ben Sawyer

Ben Sawyer

Co-Founder, Digitalmill
Games for Health


Friday June 28, 2013 10:00am - 10:45am
Room C: Patriot Room

10:00am

Quantified Self: Games & Gamification

Quantified self is the grassroots movement organized around the principal of personal biometric data gathering and analysis.  This nascent movement has grown in both size and influence over the years as people have become more interested in health but also in novel systems and services for measuring all sorts of biometric data and behavioral activity.

Some elements of the quantified landscape are very niche, novel, and experimentative – a sort of personal health hacking underground.  Other elements involve full blast startups and major products like Runkeeper, My Fitness Pal, Nike Fuel, and Jawbone Up which are clearly mass-market but also heavily influenced by the quantified self pioneers.

This sesion seeks to cover the gamut of activity that lies at the intersection of quantified self and games.  With a focus on outliers at first, we’ll comb the landscape looking for interesting stories that standout and offer interesting ideas for new innovations and apporaches to games that can improve health, fitness.  By the end we’ll work our way up to more mass market products, services, and communities, to get both a complete understanding of the activity taking place, but also the potential contrasts between the more hacker oriented culture on one end, and the large-scale consumer offerings on the other.

Attendees to this session will learn more about the world of quantified self, its related markets, but more important where things currently stand between personal health data, games and gamification, and what directions they could move in as the future unfolds.


Speakers
avatar for Alan Au

Alan Au

Technologist, academic, games for health advocate. Mentat. | | I'm passionate about bringing people and technology together to improve wellness and productivity.


Friday June 28, 2013 10:00am - 10:45am
Room B: Back Bay Grand

10:00am

Research on Games for Health: Trends, Innovations, and Standout Studies

The past 20 years have seen an impressive rise in the sheer number of digital games for health, while at the same time digital games have become more widely accepted as media that, when well designed, can benefit us in a variety of areas, including health.  What does current research reveal about the effectiveness of today's games for health, and which studies are the groundbreaking standouts?  This session presents several noteworthy trends in the research and design of games for health.  To catch up on the latest research and see how it is...or could be...shaping the design of new innovations in our field, this session provides some answers.


Speakers
avatar for Debra Lieberman

Debra Lieberman

Director, Health Games Research, UC Santa Barbara
I am a media researcher at the University of California, Santa Barbara, where I teach in the Department of Communication and direct the Health Games Research national program www.healthgamesresearch.org, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation to advance the research, design, and effectiveness of digital games aimed at improving health and health care. My research focuses on processes of learning, engagement, and behavior change with... Read More →


Friday June 28, 2013 10:00am - 10:45am
Room D: Freedom Room

11:00am

Frontline Implementation with Clinicians: Lesson from Zamzee

Zamzee is a research-proven Health Game that increases tweens’ physical activity. A six-month randomized clinical trial in 2012 by HopeLab Foundation showed that tweens using Zamzee were 59% more physically active then a control group.

Today pediatricians across the country use Zamzee Programs in primary care practices and weight management clinics to measure and motivate tween physical activity.

Learn how Zamzee developed programs to partner with healthcare providers and tackle the challenges of patient attrition, limited funding, over-scheduled doctors and sedentary behavior


Speakers
avatar for Dan Botwinick

Dan Botwinick

VP of Marketing & Program Development, Zamzee
Dan leads program development at Zamzee Co, partnering with Healthcare providers to integrate Zamzee into their practice and existing programs. Prior to joining Zamzee, Dan spent several years in the toy industry, in Marketing and product leadership roles. His products included hit toys that inspired physical activity, such as an Amazon.com's top-selling toy, Hyper Dash. Dan holds a B.A. in Child Development from Tufts University, an Ed.M... Read More →


Friday June 28, 2013 11:00am - 11:30am
Room B: Back Bay Grand

11:00am

Games for Health & Capital Formation

The Games for Health field is growing up.  The amount of strong entrepreneurial activity is growing faster-than-ever and the need and ability to raise capital has arrived at a tipping point.

This year Games for Health is adding what we expect to be a regular and growing portion of our program – a session on capital formation for games for health oriented startups and projects.


Moderators
avatar for Andrew Walker

Andrew Walker

Independant Consultant
Gamenuity

Friday June 28, 2013 11:00am - 12:00pm
Room C: Patriot Room

11:00am

Lightning Talks: Design
Moderators
avatar for Bill Sabram

Bill Sabram

Lead Game Designer, MeYou Health
Bill Sabram is the lead game designer of MeYou Health, a Boston-based start-up dedicated to creating web and mobile apps that harness the power of frequent small actions. Their flagship product, Daily Challenge, blends game mechanics, science and social support in a direct to consumer approach. Each MeYou Health product is built upon the foundation that employees are healthier when they engage in genuine, immediate, realistic and convenient... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Brock Dubbels PhD

Brock Dubbels PhD

Experimental Psychologist, G-Scale Game Development and Testing Laboratory, McMaster University Dept Computer Software Engineering
I like spending time with friends, the sound of children playing, and bare-knuckle fighting | | Educational research in cognitive psychology, curriculum and instruction, game design, theories of play and learning, assessment, instructional design, and technology innovation.
avatar for Rob Tieben

Rob Tieben

designer of swimming games, games [4 health] jams, public play installations. Design-researcher on playful interactions., Eindhoven University of Technology & Fontys University
Playful interactions! Swimming games, games [4 health] jams, mobile games, public play, playful installations at schools, etc! | | I do design-research with teenagers: eliciting them to play on a daily basis, using curiosity, emergent play and other design principles. While teenagers engage in social playful interactions, they are inherently physically active - leading to less sedentary activity, and more fun!
avatar for Lise Worthen-Chaudhari

Lise Worthen-Chaudhari

Research Assistant Professor, The Ohio State University Medical Center
I'm a dancer. I do some other things. Interactive art, biomechanics, motor control, clinical research. But mostly, I'm a dancer. I design interactive applications that promote neurorecovery through movement, and conduct patient research testing of my own and other emerging health games at The Ohio State University Medical Center.
LZ

Liz Zelinski

Rita and Edward Polusky Chair in Education and Aging | Professor of Gerontology and Psychology | Leonard Davis School of Gerontology | University of Southern California


Friday June 28, 2013 11:00am - 12:00pm
Room D: Freedom Room

11:00am

Surveys, Metrics, & Instruments : What to Ask to Assess Games & How to Do It?

There are two basic ways to assess a game for health.  First, is to instrument the game itself and use analytics to understand what is happening to the player.  Second, is to design an out-of-game instrument that you can use to assess a player’s outcome.  Ideally you can do both and look for correlations and other insights between out-of-game-data and in-game-data.

In addition to assessing a specific game for health, there is also the opportunity to do surveys of people to explore their exposure to games for health in general, as well as attitudes and beliefs about health, games, or both.

In all these cases, and other outcome measurement methods one particular thread is constant.  What to ask to begin with, and how exactly to do it?  Often this requires not only expertise in sound research methodology but also in games themselves.  For example, in talks with gamers two distinct groups emerge concerning finishing games.  Some prefer to express “beating the game” while others use “finishing the game”.  Both can mean the same, or be interpreted as having slight differences concerning emotional impact.  Could such differences be important to follow-up player surveys?  How do you parse experienced game players from casual?  What’s the best way to prepare log files for analysis?

These ideas, and more will be discussed by a panel of researchers who have recently prepared games and outside-of-game instruments and surveys for health game assessment.  Together with the audience it is sure to provide an experienced and great discussion of how we determine what games in general, and specifically, are accomplishing with their players.


Speakers
KH

Kimberly Hiefje

Deputy Director, play2PREVENT Lab, Yale University School of Medicine
Dr. Hieftje's research interests primarily focus on health promotion and behavior change through the use of videogames. Dr. Hieftje is an Associate Research Scientist at Yale University, School of Medicine, where she is currently involved in the development and testing of several health behavior change videogames. She is the Project Director for a five-year NIH grant that focuses on the development and evaluation an interactive videogame... Read More →
avatar for Magy Seif El-Nasr PhD

Magy Seif El-Nasr PhD

Associate Professor, Director of the Game Educational Programs and Research, Northeastern University
Dr. Magy Seif El-Nasr is an associate Professor in the Colleges of Computer and Information Sciences and Arts, Media and Design, where she directs the Playable Innovative Technologies Lab. Her research focuses on the development of new methods and techniques for adapting interactive virtual experiences.  She has worked on developing new intelligent lighting design methods that has been used in virtual environments as well as interactive... Read More →
JR

Jessica Rath

Director, Research and Evaluation, Legacy
Legacy for Health


Friday June 28, 2013 11:00am - 12:00pm
Room A: John Hancock Hall

11:00am

Meetup: Developing Local Games for Health Organizations

Around the world more and more organizations and events are sprouting up promoting games for health.  Some are formalized Games for Health Project branded efforts like Games for Health Europe, and Games for Health Day at SIEGE in Atlanta.  Others are informal localized groups like Games for Health NY and Games for Health Rochester which were started by local interests.

This meetup event is designed to help more interested parties on a local and global basis discuss how they can host a local working group, event, or branded event on games for health.  Attendees will be able to hear what is working for existing groups and programs, and how they can partner with The Games for Health Project to make use of our resources to help them get started.


Friday June 28, 2013 11:00am - 12:00pm
Room F: Liberty Room

11:00am

Promotion Roundtable: Tips and Ideas from Promoting Your Health Game

This session will be a combination of lecture and roundtable.  Starting out a presentation of how promotion is working in the games for health field and health apps in general will be provided.  This work will then set the stage for a discussion designed to ferret out techniques and other actions that are working for session attendees.

Join us to discuss how to promote your health game in general and how to drive discovery in crowded app and health marketplaces.


Friday June 28, 2013 11:00am - 12:00pm
Room E: Justice Room

11:30am

Finding a Revenue Stream in the Physical Therapy Gaming Business: Third Time’s a Charm

Physical therapy and related sensorimotor rehab games are often held up as one of the no-brainer business opportunities in the Games for Health field. Current rehabilitation protocols are often seen as repetitive and lacking in feedback or visual stimulation, resulting in low patient compliance. The drive to augment these activities through new technologies such as the Microsoft Kinect™, Sony Move, or Nintendo® Wii™ is clear to anyone who has looked at the many pilot projects built over the last several years.

Why then is there not a thriving commercial market for such games?

CSMi has been involved in the Physical Therapy and Athletic Training markets for many years and has recently begun building specific game-based product offerings. During this talk we’ll move beyond the topic of building better games and discuss developing sustainable business models for game-based therapy products.

The Sensorimotor Rehab and PT game market offers important lessons for developers looking at many different types of health & business opportunities with games. Come hear how one company has taken several runs and evolved its approach to turning game-based health interventions into new opportunities for patients, providers, and makers alike.


Speakers
RP

Richard Potash

Founder and President, CSMi
Rich has a life-long interest in the measurement and improvement of human performance. After receiving Bachelors and Masters Degrees in Computer Science from MIT, he founded Computer Sports Medicine, Inc. which develops strength, endurance, and balance measurement systems. His current interests include the application of gaming platforms and mobile devices to the Physical Therapy and Athletic Training markets.


Friday June 28, 2013 11:30am - 12:00pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

12:00pm

Lunch
Friday June 28, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room C: Patriot Room

12:00pm

Lunch
Friday June 28, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room A: John Hancock Hall

12:00pm

Lunch
Friday June 28, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room E: Justice Room

12:00pm

Lunch
Friday June 28, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room D: Freedom Room

12:00pm

Lunch
Friday June 28, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room F: Liberty Room

12:00pm

Lunch
Friday June 28, 2013 12:00pm - 1:00pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

1:00pm

Designing Games for Chronic Disease Management : What We've Learned

Helping a patient with chronic disease issues is one of the biggest challenges facing healthcare today. Roughly 50% of patients are failing to properly manage their health care, and lifestyle compliance hovers below 30%. Where are the magic levers of adherence and self efficacy that can drive change of often daily activities? Finding these levers is necessary if we are to reverse skyrocketing healthcare costs related to chronic disease.

Ayogo has learned that the psychology of games and play can be employed specifically to address the challenge of chronic disease management. To date they’ve prototyped or developed eleven games and applications that support patients with chronic disease.

This talk is designed to share the do’s and don’ts compiled while designing projects for leading health, pharma, and patient-related organizations. Drawing from the progression of Ayogo efforts like Healthseeker, attendees will gain the insight that often can’t be shared until you’ve been through the trials, errors, fires, and successes of multiple projects.


Speakers
avatar for Michael Fergusson

Michael Fergusson

CEO, Ayogo Health Inc.
Michael is CEO and founder of Ayogo, and dedicated to the idea that playing is one of the most meaningful and productive things we can do. He’s been an entrepreneur and innovator on the Web for over 15 years, and his games have been played by millions, on computers and smartphones all over the world. Michael has spoken eloquently about how games can increase patient engagement and improve health outcomes the 3rd Patient Adherence &... Read More →


Friday June 28, 2013 1:00pm - 1:40pm
Room A: John Hancock Hall

1:00pm

Lightning Talks: Research
Moderators
BF

Bill Ferguson

Mary-Ann Liebert Publishing

Speakers
G

Georges

Graduate Researcher, University at Buffalo Department of Communication
SUNY-Buffalo
avatar for Bob Hone

Bob Hone

Creative Director, Red Hill Studios
We've designed and produced health games that help people address neuromuscular disorders such as cerebral palsy and Parkinson's disease, cognitive games for multiple sclerosis, and behavior change games to encourage children to drink more water. We partner with leading academic research centers such as UCSF, Stanford, and the Kessler Institute in our NIH-funded projects (SBIR/STTR). We're also active developers of educational apps such as... Read More →
avatar for Rachel Proffitt

Rachel Proffitt

Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Southern California
Dr. Rachel Proffitt is a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Southern California in the Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy. She was previously an Adjunct Assistant Professor of Clinical Occupational Therapy at the USC Division of Occupational Science and Occupational Therapy, where she taught courses in Qualitative Research and Assistive Technology. She received her OTD from Washington University School of Medicine... Read More →
avatar for Nadja Reilly

Nadja Reilly

Associate Director, Freedman Center for Child and Family Development, Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology
Massachusetts School of Professional Psychology
avatar for Beth Ann Walker

Beth Ann Walker

Assistant Professor, University of Indianapolis
Beth Ann is an assistant professor and teaches in the areas of research methodology and analysis within the School of Occupational Therapy of University of Indianapolis. Beth Ann also teaches elective courses on gerotechnology and virtual gaming in rehabilitation. Her research interests involve investigating the design and use of various rehabilitative gaming technologies with older adult users.
LZ

Liz Zelinski

Rita and Edward Polusky Chair in Education and Aging | Professor of Gerontology and Psychology | Leonard Davis School of Gerontology | University of Southern California


Friday June 28, 2013 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room D: Freedom Room

1:00pm

Sensors & Devices: The Future of Games for Health Hardware
Sessions for Games for Health 2013APRIL 2, 2013 BY BENSAWYER (EDIT)

Many more sessions are coming, but here is the first draft of content we’re going to have at this year’s Games for Health Conference including our first announced keynote!

Stay tuned for more announcements and additional information over the next two weeks as we finalize all three days of Games for Health 2013.

First Announced Keynotes!Healing and Health with Virtual Reality
Palmer Luckey, Founder Oculus VR

For years, developers have strived to make immersive virtual worlds, and gamers have spent countless billions on the systems that play them best. Software, hardware, and input devices have all leapt forward, but the connection between the player and the virtual world has remained limited.

We’ve dreamed of stepping inside of our games, but the best we’ve been able to do is puppet characters through a tiny window! Until now. Technological progress in a variety of fields has finally brought immersive virtual reality within reach.

During this keynote, Oculus VR founder, and designer of the Oculus Rift VR headset, Palmer Luckey will talk about the intersection of body, mind, and virtual reality, and offer insights into how this new game technology can make a positive impact on the health of people and communities.

How a Mobile Game (and Zombies!)
Got 500,000 People Running for Their Lives!


Six to Start and author Naomi Alderman combine the emotional power of world-class storytelling with next-generation media to make unforgettable games and experiences.

Arguably the best mobile exergame to date, Zombies, Run! has sold over 400,000 copies and has seen fans of the game from around the world use it as a key part of their outdoor and indoor exercise routine.

This Keynote presentation by members of Six to Start’s Zombies, Run! team will delve into the inside story of the game’s development. From its successful Kickstarter debut to its current bestselling status on leading mobile platforms, you’ll get it all – with zombies included.

Over 40 additional sessions are also now posted online including…

 

Games for Autism: Therapy and Diagnosis

This session combines two talks orientated around opportunities with games for children with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

Talk 1: Access Granted: Exploring Video Games as a Therapeutic Tool for Children with Autism

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting approximately 1 in 88 individuals in the United States. General characteristics of ASD include deficits in verbal and nonverbal communication, social interaction, and restricted and repetitive behaviors and interests. Regardless of ASD symptoms, research indicates that individuals with this disorder prefer to engage with activities they find interesting and motivating.

During this talk research and findings will be presented developed by exploring both how and why individuals with ASD choose and interact with technology, especially popular media such as video games and the perceptions of their parents about games and related technologies. Attendees to this session will gain insight on how, and why games might be effective for children with Autism and the best paths to successfully addressing Autism populations with games.

Talk 2: Assessing Play: Using Games To Diagnose Autism

This talk looks at how a game-based solution of interactive social challenges can help to possibly replace or augment existing clinical methods for childhood diagnosis of Autism with a game-based solution.

The psychological and psychiatric clinicians have been the driving force behind our game because they are frustrated by the lack of ecological validity in the most widely used interview-based methodologies. Time and again, parents doubt that the answers children provided when presented with oral descriptions of social situations are accurately representative of what they have seen those children do in similar situations in real life.

This presentation will showcase a system that weaves assessment into a game environment and will include discussions of how it was tailored to different environments and for addressing social information processing issues like those faced by children on the Autism spectrum. Also included will describe preliminary clinical results gathered in early 2013 as this game is shared with both ASD and Typically Developing Children.

Games for a New Climate: An International Collaboration in Research and Design

Is play an effective vehicle for preparing for climate change? Can games be part of long-term strategies for better organizing volunteer-driven organizations? Do academic-driven research methods lead to field-ready tools? Over the last four years, Parsons The New School for Design’s PETLab has collaborated with the American Red Cross and the Red Cross/Red Crescent Climate Centre to explore these and other questions.

Games for a New Climate has produced games with ambitious goals: prepare communities at risk due to changes in the local climate; assist the Red Cross staff in training its volunteers; and help individuals and communities better forecast and plan for potential problems, including the implications of climate change on public health. John Sharp, PETLab’s co-director, will discuss the games the project has produced, the methodologies used for developing the games, and the successes and shortcomings of the project thus far.

New ideas for Pervasive Exergaming

Exergaming is a stalwart genre in commercial game circles now. Extensions into schools have become regular forays of companies often as adjuncts to P.E. class curriculums. Despite all the activity there remains a large gap between the capabilities and sales of exergames as a commercial category and their scaled and applicable uses in organizations such as schools, and even enterprises.

This session gathers two projects and a leading researcher together to explore new concepts in exergaming. Pervasive exergaming imagines a world where the distance between any one user and a beneficial exergaming experience is reduced to 0. There is no major equipment to be secured. Experiences are tied together across modalities and locations and the gamut of activities and presentations moves beyond just a fitness oriented dipiction.

Attendees to this session will get an overview of where exergaming stands today and what sorts of new trends may be signaling innovation and opportunities to reduce the barriers to exergaming reaching its potential. This review will then give way to presentations by two projects that are looking to break exergaming into new forms and platforms.

HealthTeacher is using purposely simple game concepts delivered over the Web to classrooms to create easily deployable movement games into schools that can be played outside distinct periods of P.E.

Fitness Interactive eXperience is creating a browser based experience that acts as a delivery platform of exergame experiences to end users across multiple population types to become a system that could stitch together many distinct forms of exergaming together.

What We’ve Learned From Casual Games and Where We’re Going With Defense Games

Featuring six years of data collection from ongoing studies on the effects of casual video games on depression, anxiety and cognition, this presentation provides an overview of research at East Carolina University’s Psychophysiology Lab that has been compiling evidence of the positive effects of casual video games on health.

Emphasis will be placed upon the usefulness of casual video games in ameliorating symptoms of physical and mental conditions as well as in improving overall cognitive function/performance. Data from several recently completed studies using physiological and biochemical markers will be presented.

The session will also discuss a new Department of Defense funded projects involving naturalistic games for assessment, intervention and evaluation using mobile platforms.

Attendees will learn about current neurological theories and research findings on the positive effects on stress, mood and cognition, hear a discussion about the practical applications for video games with positive health effects, and discuss the use of naturalistic games for assessment industry.

Virulent & Progenator X : Using Games to Explore the Science of Biology & Health

The University of Wisconsin’s Games, Learning, and Society Lab (GLS) has created and distributed several games that focus on explaining key biological concepts to the public-at-large. This session features demonstrations of those projects, how they came to be, and what was learned by creating and releasing them.

Two Board Games for Health : Monster Appetite & Aligning Forces 4 Quality

Increasingly we are seeing game designers move back and forth between paper and electronic forms and cross-pollinating ideas between the two modalities. While Games for Health focuses heavily on computer-game based projects this session looks at two recently developed board games designed to address issues in health & healthcare.

Monster Appetite addresses the obesity epidemic, one of America’s largest public health challenges, now growing in the rest of …


Speakers
AR

Alec Rooney

VP of Engineering, knowledge labs
wireless and m2m networks
PS

Peter Smith

ADL Co-Lab
ADL Co-Lab


Friday June 28, 2013 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

1:00pm

Grant, proposal, and RFP writing : Selling Your Game for Health Ideas & Skills

This roundtable discussion will attempt to draw out questions, answers, and tough problems related to the many aspects of writing, and responding to grants, development, and research proposals.  The agenda will start with discussion about the actual writing of an RFP and what could make RFPs from both public and private organizations from both the provider and responder perspectives.

The discussion will then shift to what makes for great responses tackling both calls for research, and calls for development.  Through it all we will attempt to collect a series of tips both for providers and responders that we can share online in an effort to improve the results that come from the traditional process that lies at the heart of how many games and related research are funded.


Friday June 28, 2013 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room E: Justice Room

1:00pm

Meetup: Cognitive & Emotional Health Developers & Researchers
Meetups are designed to provide a time and space to support critical birds of a feather discussions.  Our cognitive and emotional health meetup brings together developers and researchers from one of the most active games for health subgroups.

Friday June 28, 2013 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room F: Liberty Room

1:00pm

Accelerator Pathways for Funding, Development & Mentoring

Accelerators are a growing presence in the world of startups.  Recently game oriented accelerators have been growing around the world and verticals in health and fitness have also been founded.  These programs offer very specific opportunities and are especially useful for teams with established ideas and products that are looking for the support and final push needed to make the jump to greater levels of financing or market launch.

This panel brings together members of two successful accelerator systems one in games, and one in health to discuss how they operate, what types of entrepreneurs they work with best, how mentoring works, and the patterns of success that they see benefit from the accelerator process.  Once the basics are covered the panel will turn its attention to discussions of games for health specifically and without being partial to any one idea, talk about the opportunities and roadblocks exist toward seeing a more robust level of startup activity take hold.


Speakers
avatar for Amy Puliafito

Amy Puliafito

Rock Health
Amy leads research, social media, and marketing at Rock Health. Previously, she worked for the Keck School of Medicine of USC and Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School for Public Health, and was in charge of fundraising at a non-profit that led international training trips for physicians in Mongolia and China. She has a BA in sociology from Northwestern.


Friday June 28, 2013 1:00pm - 2:00pm
Room C: Patriot Room

1:40pm

Quit IT: Teaching Coping Strategies Through Interactive Storytelling
This talk discusses Quit IT a project for teaching coping strategies for smoking cessation.  

For decades, the standard behavioral treatment for smoking urges has been behavioral rehearsal, which entails the identification, modeling, and role-playing of diverse cognitive and behavioral coping strategies to identify and manage smoking cues. This treatment promotes skill acquisition, bolsters confidence in coping with smoking cues, and reduces relapse to smoking.

In game vernacular, this skills acquisition approach is called “mastery” and is consistent with a gamer player’s experience as they advance through a variety of game genres such as Role Playing Games (RPGs). By enabling patients to interact with realistic environments, virtual reality environments are uniquely suited to engaging recent ex-smokers in skill-building activities for managing urges to smoke. Virtual reality games and simulations provide environments similar to those faced in the real world, which increases personal relevance and learning potential. With applications more diverse than entertainment, games serve as powerful tools because they encompass many aspects of human learning, such as engagement, problem-solving, receiving corrective feedback, and repetition.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Fiske

Jeff Fiske

Lead Designer, Muzzy Lane Software
I have been designing strategy games for over fifteen years and have always seen them as an opportunity for a deeper level of learning. I enjoy creating the mental models that allow users to relive key moments in history that allow people to explore 'what it would have been' like to be somewhere in a certain point in time. | | To have the chance to contribute to the development of something as important as a smoking cessation tool is a huge... Read More →


Friday June 28, 2013 1:40pm - 2:00pm
Room A: John Hancock Hall

2:10pm

Billions of Steps Gamed: Lessons from Virgin HealthMiles
When we look at why some wellness programs aren’t successful, there are often several common denominators that surface: they’ve been put into practice using the surveillance method; they’ve been set up as health risk assessments (HRAs) to identify the sickest or potentially “least healthy” employees; and/or the consumer doesn’t have a choice when it comes to participation. That’s why companies looking to invest in or realign programs need to consider a Wellness 2.0 strategy.

In essence, they should look to develop programs that are not only designed with the consumer, culture and demographic (age/gender/psychographic profile) in mind, but that also give consumers choice when it comes to participation. This presentation will discuss how to get the most out of your corporate wellness program, utilizing gamification to engage and excite participants.

David Coppins, president, client services and member engagement, at Virgin HealthMiles, will shed some light into how to use gamification successfully to create a more productive, engaged workforce.

Speakers
avatar for David Coppins

David Coppins

President, Client Services and Member Engagement, Virgin HealthMiles
David Coppins brings a depth of consumer experience to the Virgin HealthMiles management team. In 2012, David became Virgin HealthMiles’ President, Client Services and Member Engagement, and joined the company’s board of directors. Leveraging Virgin’s “consumer champion” roots, David oversees the integration of client services and member engagement to ensure both employers and employees reach their goals. David’s group leads the... Read More →


Friday June 28, 2013 2:10pm - 2:50pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

2:10pm

Bridging the Gap: The LearningWorks Model for Connecting Health-Game Users and Producers

This presentation will follow an idea germinated in a psychologist’s office to help parents find and use popular games and apps for improving problem solving and academic skills in children with ADHD, Autism, and Learning Disabilities. We will describe early efforts including the use of popular games such as Roller Coaster Tycoon in group therapy,  homework guides for parents to talk to their kids about the their video game play, and the subsequent development of an informational website describing how popular console games could be used for improving critical-thinking and executive-functioning skills.

The current iteration, LearningWorks for Kids, is a subscription-based educational technology website directed primarily towards parents of children with special needs. We will describe how the current website, while providing a wealth of free information for all parents about how best to use popular games and apps to improve their children’s thinking and academic skills, has evolved to become targeted at families with special needs children. We will detail how it uses interactive assessment tools to individualize a profile and create an ongoing prescriptions of games and apps for children with ADHD, autism, and Learning Disabilities. Initial marketing, website development, and research will be discussed.

LearningWorks for Kids bridges the gap between users and producers by creating value-added material about popular games and apps that not only tell parents which games and apps to select,  but also, more importantly, how to transfer game-based learning skills to the real world. We show how popular games and apps can be used so that they become games for health. Finally, we discuss strategies so that game and app publishers can begin to integrate strategies for generalizing game-based skills to the real world and how they can more effectively market fun and engaging games as tools that can be useful for health and learning.  


Speakers
RK

Randy Kulman

Learning Works for Kids
Learning Works for Kids


Friday June 28, 2013 2:10pm - 2:50pm
Room C: Patriot Room

2:10pm

International Review: Asia/Pacific
Games for health is a global undertaking and many exciting projects are taking place in the Asia-Pacific locations.  We’ve gathered together some of the most recent projects and relevant games with the help of our community members in the region to present an up-to-date overview of work in the region.

Speakers
avatar for Alan Au

Alan Au

Technologist, academic, games for health advocate. Mentat. | | I'm passionate about bringing people and technology together to improve wellness and productivity.
JK

Jeongeun Kim

Professor, Seoul National University
I am the dreamer to develop Game-based Personal Health Record.


Friday June 28, 2013 2:10pm - 2:50pm
Room D: Freedom Room

2:10pm

The Use of Games for Health: Is There a "Gaming Addiction" Side Effect?

Games for health are widely used in medicine and psychology, but there is still the question, if there are any side effects of using games – can people get addicted to games?

Psychologists are generally familiar with the concept of “addiction”. Nevertheless, there is no specific definition of addiction in the DSM; disorders connected with addiction are dispersed throughout the manual. For example, substance related disorders refer to the dependence (not addiction!) of a substance, e.g. alcohol, cocaine or marijuana.

However, some researchers applied a concept of addiction (or substance related disorder) to an excessive use of games and labeled it “”online gaming addiction”". Charlton and Danforth (2007) discussed this general application of addiction to “excessive gaming” critically; they emphasize the differences between a highly engaged and a solely “addictive” gaming behavior with similar criteria to those of substance related disorders. This is especially important when it comes to “”games for health”" – can a minority get addicted to games when there is a “”gaming overdose”"? And how does this affect the psychological application of games for health?

This talk looks at the concept that the diagnostic criteria of “excessive” gaming still remains unclear; however, there are no doubts that there is a minority of gamers having problems because of an overuse of online roleplaying games. For example, we observed a sample of high-level World of Warcraft players in respect of differences between a highly engaged and addicted behavior. We found out that there are differences between a highly engaged and an addicted behavior with the first often erroneously labelled as “addiction”. There are significant differences when it comes to the weekly amount of time spent online, quality of life, etc.

Furthermore, research we’ll discuss showed “maladaptive cognitions concerning the Internet” as a crucial factor of “pathological internet use”, leading to a problematic use of the internet. Interestingly, in a recent study we found out that these maladaptive cognitions decrease in an intervention group (online game-based training for shy students); we didn’t find any effects in a waiting-list control group.

I present some results of our studies concerning gaming addiction and the use of interventions with the help of new media. Based on these results, this talk discusses the concept of “gaming addiction” critically, especially when it comes to the emerging field of games for health.


Speakers
ML

Mario Lehenbauer

Wein University
Wein University


Friday June 28, 2013 2:10pm - 2:50pm
Room E: Justice Room

3:00pm

Games, Medical Devices and the FDA: Now, Near & Next
Do you know which video games are subject to regulation by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)?
Answer: All of them! (At least potentially.)

At this session, attandees will learn why some games for health might be regulated as medical devices by FDA, and what that means for game developers.  Attendees will also be updated on FDA's latest efforts to regulate mobile medical apps and how those efforts might affect games for health.  In sum, this session will help demystify the FDA process and attempt to remove the ""scare factor"" of government regulation of video games.

Speakers
avatar for Igor Gorlach

Igor Gorlach

Healthcare Associate, Foley Hoag LLP
The healthcare practice at Foley Hoag helps companies comply with FDA regulations and develop a relationship with the agency. We also guide companies through the reimbursement process for Medicare, Medicaid and other public and private insurers. My colleagues at the transaction law group also help prepare companies for mergers, acquisitions, IPOs, and other transactions.


Friday June 28, 2013 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Room B: Back Bay Grand

3:00pm

Lessons Games for Health Efforts Can Take From the Evolving Commercial Videogame Business

The commercial games business is over $50B in global revenues that is currently going through gut wrenching changes.  This talk will focus on these changes both good and bad, and relate them to the challenges and opportunities in the games for health field.

By looking at changes like free-to-play, mobile games, the indie scene, federated aggregators like Kongregate and new systems like Ouya, and Gamestick there is a lot to learn from the leading edges of change in games as a whole.


Speakers
avatar for Andrew Walker

Andrew Walker

Independant Consultant
Gamenuity


Friday June 28, 2013 3:00pm - 3:30pm
Room C: Patriot Room